COURSE OFFERINGS

Please note, this is a tentative list of course offerings and is subject to change.
Last updated July 31, 2018.
For the most current listing, see http://websoc.reg.uci.edu/perl/WebSoc.

 
Fall 2018 Course Offerings
2A
Introduction to Sociocultural Anthropology (Lec A - Zhan, M.)
Introduction to cultural diversity and the methods used by anthropologists to account for it. Family relations, economic activities, politics, gender, and religion in a wide range of societies. Stresses the application of anthropological methods to research problems.
2A
Introduction to Sociocultural Anthropology (Lec B - Douglas, T.)
Introduction to cultural diversity and the methods used by anthropologists to account for it. Family relations, economic activities, politics, gender, and religion in a wide range of societies. Stresses the application of anthropological methods to research problems.
2B
Introduction to Biological Anthropology (Egan, J.)
Evolutionary theory and processes, comparative primate fossil record, human variation, and the adequacy of theory, and empirical data.
2C

Intro to Archaeology (Drover, C.)
Archaeological theory and cultural processes with emphasis on the American Southwest, Mesoamerica, and Mesopotamia.

10A

Probability & Stats (Huffman, M.)
An introduction to probability and statistics. Emphasis on a thorough understanding of the probabilistic basis of statistical inference. Emphasizes examples from sociology, anthropology, and related social science disciplines.

25A Environmental Injustice (Fortun, K.). Course website
Explores how pollution, climate change, and other environmental problems impact people around the world, often worsening social inequality. Students use social science frameworks to understand environmental problems, different interpretations of these problems, and how people have organized for political change.
41A Global Cultures and Society (Douglas, T.)
Offers a general overview of the rise of global interdependence in political, economic, demographic, and cultural terms. Considers what drove people from relative isolation into intensified intercourse with one another, and investigates the consequences of this shift.
125A
Economic Anthropology (Egan, J.)
Economic systems in comparative perspective: production, distribution, and consumption in market and non-market societies; agricultural development in the third world.
132A
Psychological Anthropology (O'Rourke, S.)
Cultural differences and similarities in personality and behavior. Child-rearing practices and consequent adult personality characteristics, biocultural aspects of child development and attachment, culture and behavior evolutionary models, politically linked personality, cognitive anthropology, psychology of narrative forms, comparative national character studies.
134A
Medical Anthropology (Jenks, A.)
Introduces students to cross-cultural perspectives and critical theories in anthropological studies of medicine. Special attention is given to diverse ways of understanding bodies, illnesses, and therapeutic practices in our changing world.
134F Anthropology of the Body (O'Rourke, S.)
Examines human bodies as both biological and sociocultural entities and explores the relationship among mind, body,and society cross-culturally. Topics include embodiment; race, sex, gender and the body; somatization; control of the body; commodified bodies; and hybrid/cyborg bodies.
139A Anthropology of Debt (Straughn, I.)
Student debt approaches $1.5 trillion while the US national debt climbs to $22 trillion. How has such fantastical indebtedness shaped culture, identity and social practice across the globe and through time? This course examines how debt becomes entangled with all manner of cultural phenomena: slavery, hierarchy, consumption, markets, ritual practice, racism, gender and, of course, education.
139B

Nationalism, Extremism, & the Right (Mahmud, L.)
Nationalism is a cultural and political category. Classic texts on the nation as an "imagined community" are assigned alongside their feminist and postcolonial critiques to contextualize ideologies of citizenship and belonging within particular experiences of gender, race, sexuality, class, religion.

139C
Fringe Archeology (Straughn, I.)
Archaeology has inspired, and even, actively encouraged any number of theories about aliens, lost civilizations, dark conspiracies, apocalyptic predictions, and mysterious technologies. How did this scholarly field that examines the past through the material remains of human societies, become so intimately caught up in such fantastical notions?
163A
Peoples of the Pacific (Egan, J.)
The cultural history and recent developments among the Pacific peoples of Polynesia, Micronesia, Melanesia, New Guinea, and Australia.
169A
SE AS & SE AS Immigrants (Douglas, T.)
This class provides on overview on some of the histories and cultures of Southeast Asia and also looks at some groups of Southeast Asian immigrants who have come to the US. Geographically, Southeast Asia includes Insular Southeast Asia - Malaysia, Singapore, Indonesia, East Timor, Brunei, The Philippines, as well as Mainland Southeast Asia – Burma (Myanmar), Thailand, Cambodia, Laos, and Vietnam. Ecologically and culturally, we can also consider parts of southwestern China - Yunnan Province and parts of Szechuan Province, up to the borders of Tibet to be included as part of Southeast Asia.
169C Transnational Korea (Chee, S.)
This class explores Korea through the lens of transnationalism and love. While these two concepts may seem on opposing ends of the spectrum, we will examine how they are interrelated – on the level international relations, nationalism, and on the level of personal love. For the course, love will be examined as a structure of feeling (Williams), arising out of a complex web of politics, religion history, and culture that we seek to disentangle. As a structure of feeling, we will learn about how concepts of love has evolved over the past 100 years in relation to Korea's history as a dynasty, a colony, and a divided nation, as well as delve into related topics such as religion, sexuality, gender, marriage, sex work (and slavery) and national belonging. The course seeks to answer the following questions, how does love (or hate) between Korea's closest neighbors (the United States, Japan, China, and North Korea) effect the construction of a Korean national identity? How were concepts of love influenced by key historical events in Korea? Finally, how does personal love contribute to or get rejected by a narrative of nationalism?
180AW Anthro Major Seminar (O'Rourke, S.)
A course in anthropological theory designed especially for majors in Anthropology.

 

Winter 2019 Course Offerings

2A
Intro to Sociocultural Anthro (Lec A) (Kim, E.)
Introduction to cultural diversity and the methods used by anthropologists to account for it. Family relations, economic activities, politics, gender, and religion in a wide range of societies. Stresses the application of anthropological methods to research problems.
2A
Intro to Sociocultural Anthro (Lec B) (Egan, J.)
Introduction to cultural diversity and the methods used by anthropologists to account for it. Family relations, economic activities, politics, gender, and religion in a wide range of societies. Stresses the application of anthropological methods to research problems.
2D
Intro to Language Culture  (Richland, J.)
Explores what the study of language can reveal about ourselves as bearers of culture. After introducing some basic concepts, examines how cultural knowledge is linguistically organized and how language might shape our perception of the world
10B
Probability & Statstics  (Faust, K)
An introduction to probability and statistics. Emphasis on a thorough understanding of the probabilistic basis of statistical inference. Emphasizes examples from sociology, anthropology, and related social science disciplines.
20A
People, Culture, and Environmental Sustainability (Egan, J.)
Anthropological consideration of global environmental sustainability from the perspective of human cultures and communities. Causes and consequences of population growth, natural resource management, environmental law, environmental ethics. Case studies emphasize tropical rain forests, arid lands of Africa and North America.
30A
Global Issues in Anthropological Perspective (Douglas, T.)
Explores anthropological perspectives on issues of importance in an increasingly global society. Topics include emphases on ethnic conflict; identity; immigration and citizenship; religion and religious diversity; medical anthropology; legal anthropology; development and economic change; gender.
30B
Ethnography and Anthropological Methods (Peterson, K.)
Explores ethnography, anthropology's classic method. Students obtain hands-on training in participant observation, interviewing, and other methods, in local communities, and the preparation of research reports. Also provides theoretical and reflexive readings on ethnography.
30C
Visual Anthropology (Varzi, R.)
Focusing on the construction of culture through visuality, this course engages traditional ethnographic films, popular media and anthropological texts to analyze ethics, "reality" and fiction; propaganda and documentary, construction of a frame, the responsibility of the filmmaker, photographer, and anthropologist.
41A
Global Cultures & Society (Douglas, T.)
Offers a general overview of the rise of global interdependence in political, economic, demographic, and cultural terms. Considers what drove people from relative isolation into intensified intercourse with one another, and investigates the consequences of this shift.
121AW
Kinship and Social Organization (Egan, J.)
Organization of social life primarily in preindustrial societies. Theories of kinship, marriage regulations, sexual behavior, and social roles. Comparisons of biological, psychological, sociological, and economic explanations of social organization.
121D
Cross-Cultural Studies in Gender (Mahmud, L.). Course Website
Explores the construction of "gender" in national and transnational contexts. Special attention is given to how race, sexuality, class, and global inequalities shape different experiences of gender, and to how gender structures political, institutional, and social life across the world.
125F
Humans and Other Animals (Olson, V.)
Explores peoples' relationships with other animals, a topic that continues to shape anthropological understandings of humanness, culture, and the social. Subthemes: symbol and matter, nature/culture, ontologies, relations, moralities, ecologies, futures.
128A
Science, Technology, Controversy (STAFF)
Explores ways in which the social sciences conceive of science as a sociocultural practice. Emphasis on literature in Science and Technology Studies (STS), especially writings that concern the relationship of science to space and place, power, and politics.
128B
Race, Gender & Science (Fletcher, E.) Course Website
Perfect for pre-health, science and social science majors wanting to appreciate how science and society interact. Race and gender as biological and socio-cultural constructs are examined. Questions explored: What is disease? What is science? What are social and biological differences.
134A
Medical Anthropology (Fletcher, E.) Course Website
Introduces students to cross-cultural perspectives and critical theories in anthropological studies of medicine. Special attention is given to diverse ways of understanding bodies, illnesses, and therapeutic practices in our changing world.
136K
Woman and the Body (O'Rourke, S.)
Probes culture and politics of the female body in contemporary American life. Focusing on "feminine beauty," examines diverse notions of beauty, bodily practices, and body politics embraced by American women of different classes, ethnicities, and sexualities.
139
Consumption & Culture (Straughn, I.)
Do we live in a time of too much stuff? Are we poised to enter an age that shuns the impulse to consume ever more material things? Or do our attachments to the products of our labor so define us that we cannot live without them? This course explores the ways in which objects – from the most mundane commodities to exceptional works of human artifice – shape our social relationships, concepts of nature and culture, and our very selves. Does the material culture that we make, use, and discard on a daily basis have its own agency, the power to have us do what it wants? As the internet of things and AI become increasingly more ubiquitous and sophisticated such concerns over the agency of the stuff we produce and consume force us to think about the ethical relationships we have with our possessions. We already think about them, obsess over them, and, paradoxically, ignore them quite a lot. In fact, certain categories of objects are enshrined with certain rights and protections such as archaeological artifacts and other forms of "cultural patrimony." Others are just trash, waste, and hazards to the environment. A key aspect of this course is to provide tools and methods for how to analyze material culture and practices of consumption in order to unpack the ways in which societies both possess and are possessed by their stuff. Here, the concepts of ritual, habitus, and phenomenology become important frameworks for understanding the ways in which we experience our world of things.
139
Urban Ethnography US (Sojoyner, D.)
The urban ethnographer. Out in the big city, clawing amidst the calamity that add complexity to people's lives. However, what is the point of urban ethnography? Rather than an existential question, an emphasis of this course is to cull through the history of the field and understand the very oft-problematic stance of urban ethnography to racialized, gendered and sexed populations in the United States.
141A
Ancient Civilizations of Mexico & Southwest (Drover, C.). Course website
The prehistory and cultural evolution of the civilization which originated in Mexico, including the Olmecs, Aztecs, Toltecs, Maya, and Zapotec, as well as the Pueblos of the Southwestern U.S. Topics include the origins of food production and of the state.
169B
Religions of SouthEast Asia (Douglas, T.)
This class examines key religious elements, bit historical and contemporary, that have profoundly influenced Southeast Asian history, culture and the Southeast Asian diaspora. cla both a historical and cultural overview of various religions that have been practiced or are currently practiced in Southeast Asia. The class will look at various forms of animism (such as nat worship in Burma, shamanism among the Hmong and the Barong dance in Bali), forms of Hinduism/Brahminism (including kingly cult worship based on Saivism and Vaishnavism that was a major part of the region's past), Mahayana Buddhism, Theravada Buddhism, Islam, Catholicism and the many syncretic ways in which various religious traditions were often uniquely blended together in Southeast Asia.
169C
Egyptomania (Straughn, I.)
The culture of ancient Egypt, everything from its mythology and ritual practice to its monuments and every day
artifacts, has captured the imagination of the various civilizations that followed and came in contact with the land of
the Nile. Long before Europeans descended upon the sands of Egypt to hunt for its treasures and give rise to their
academic study, the Pharaohs and their mark on the landscape intrigued Greeks, Romans, Byzantines, Arabs and
countless others. This course examines this fascination with all things Egypt and how it has become transformed into
both a field of study – Egyptology – and as a scientific, commercial, artistic and even spiritual passion.
180AW
Anthropology Major Seminar - Writing Sciences (Fortun, M.)
Explores the complexities of the sciences and scientists – the interwoven cultural, technical, social, ethical, and political dimensions of scientific worlds from laboratories to legislatures. We learn from the writings of scientists, science writers, anthropologists, and other researchers how to understand the sciences not as a disinterested pursuit of abstract eternal truth, but as a human activity fully immersed in a world of uncertainties, charged histories, scarce resources, differences of language and culture, and the harsh realities of both nature and politics. Over the course of the quarter students will develop an independent research project on a topic of their choice, building toward a short article about a scientist, a recent discovery or controversy, a health or environmental problem in need of better scientific insight, or similar topic of contemporary interest and importance.
H190B
Honors Field Research (Jenks, A.)
Students begin or continue ethnographic field research that combines exploratory field research (e.g., participant-observation, interviews, study of archival and documentary materials) with fixed format data collection methods (e.g., standardized interviews, behavioral observations).

 

Spring 2019 Course Offerings

2A
Intro to Sociocultural Anthro (Lec A) (Kim, E.)
Introduction to cultural diversity and the methods used by anthropologists to account for it. Family relations, economic activities, politics, gender, and religion in a wide range of societies. Stresses the application of anthropological methods to research problems.
2A
Intro to Sociocultural Anthro (Lec B) (Douglas, T.)
Introduction to cultural diversity and the methods used by anthropologists to account for it. Family relations, economic activities, politics, gender, and religion in a wide range of societies. Stresses the application of anthropological methods to research problems.
2B
Intro to Biological Anthrpology  (Egan, J.)
Evolutionary theory and processes, comparative primate fossil record, human variation, and the adequacy of theory, and empirical data.
2C
Intro to Archaeology  (Drover, C.)
Archaeological theory and cultural processes with emphasis on the American Southwest, Mesoamerica, and Mesopotamia.
10B
Probability & Statstics  (Staff)
An introduction to probability and statistics. Emphasis on a thorough understanding of the probabilistic basis of statistical inference. Emphasizes examples from sociology, anthropology, and related social science disciplines.
30B
Ethnography and Anthropological Field Methods (Egan, J.)
Explores ethnography, anthropology's classic method. Students obtain hands-on training in participant observation, interviewing, and other methods, in local communities, and the preparation of research reports. Also provides theoretical and reflexive readings on ethnography.
41A
Global Cultures & Society (Douglas, T.)
Offers a general overview of the rise of global interdependence in political, economic, demographic, and cultural terms. Considers what drove people from relative isolation into intensified intercourse with one another, and investigates the consequences of this shift.
45A
Science, Culture & Power  (Fortun, M.)
Examines science in historical and cultural context (Scientific and Darwinian Revolutions, Manhattan Project, contemporary biosciences) to understand scientific truths and their limits, scientists as social actors, and vital intersections of sciences with religion, politics, gender, and other forms of culture.
121AW
Kinship and Social Organization (Egan, J.)
Organization of social life primarily in preindustrial societies. Theories of kinship, marriage regulations, sexual behavior, and social roles. Comparisons of biological, psychological, sociological, and economic explanations of social organization.
132A
Psychological Anthrpology (O'Rourke, S.)

Cultural differences and similarities in personality and behavior. Child-rearing practices and consequent adult personality characteristics, biocultural aspects of child development and attachment, culture and behavior evolutionary models, politically linked personality, cognitive anthropology, psychology of narrative forms, comparative national character studies.

134B
Cultures of Biomedicine (Fletcher, E.)
An introduction to the anthropolobical study of biomedicine and biotechnology. Topics include medicalization, experimentation and discovery, diagnosis, expertise, health activism, and biotechnology.
134F
Anthropology of the Body (Fletcher, E.)
Examines human bodies as both biological and sociocultural entities and explores the relationship among mind, body, and society cross-culturally. Topics include embodiment; race, sex, gender, and the body; somatization; control of the body; commodified bodies; and hybrid/cyborg bodies.
136B
History of Anthropological Theory (Douglas, T.)
Provides foundational knowledge in the discipline of anthropology by reviewing competing approaches in anthropological theory, from the nineteenth century to the present. Covers historically fundamental approaches—social evolutionism, functionalism—and recent movements such as feminism, cultural studies, poststructuralism, and postmodernism.
139A
Prisons and Public Education (Sojoyner, D.)
Looks at the connections between schools and prisons in the United States. Students learn about ideas that push beyond common trope of the "school to prison pipeline."
149A
Cognitive Archaeology (Drover, C.)
course description
149B
Archaeology, Politics and Identity (Straughn, I.)
course description
149C
I Dig UCI (Straughn, I.)
An introduction to archaeological fieldwork through participation in an active excavation on campus. Students engage with research design and learn the foundational methods of archaeological recovery: survey, mapping, sampling strategies, documentation, excavation, artifact identification, and interpretation.
165A
Modern Iran: Cinema and Society (Varzi, R.)
Exploring modern Iran through film, literature, photography, travel writing, philosophy and social science texts introduces students to important concepts in post-colonial studies, social thought, war culture, religion and media as experienced through the paradigm of a non-Western modernity.
169
Captain Cook (Marcus, G/Seed, P.)
course description
H191W
Honors Writing Seminar (Jenks, A.)
Student drafts a senior honor thesis (typically) with the following sections: problem statement, literature review, ethnographic background, description of the methods, results, and conclusions.

 

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