COURSE OFFERINGS

Please note, this is a tentative list of course offerings and is subject to change.
Last updated Dec. 18, 2020.

For the most current listing, see http://websoc.reg.uci.edu/perl/WebSoc.

 

 

Fall 2020 Course Offerings             **Please note all Fall 2020 courses will be "Online/Remote"**

Course Number Course Title
2A

Introduction to Sociocultural Anthropology (Lec A - Douglas, T.) (Satisfies GE Requirements III & VIII)
Introduction to cultural diversity and the methods used by anthropologists to account for it. Family relations, economic activities, politics, gender, and religion in a wide range of societies. Stresses the application of anthropological methods to research problems.

2A

Introduction to Sociocultural Anthropology (Lec B - Douglas, T.) (Satisfies GE Requirements III & VIII)
Introduction to cultural diversity and the methods used by anthropologists to account for it. Family relations, economic activities, politics, gender, and religion in a wide range of societies. Stresses the application of anthropological methods to research problems.

2B

Introduction to Biological Anthropology (Egan, J.) (Satisfies GE Requirement III)
Evolutionary theory and processes, comparative primate fossil record, human variation, and the adequacy of theory, and empirical data.

2C

Intro to Archaeology (Straughn, I.) (Satisfies GE Requirement III)
What the heck is the archaeological record and why does it matter? This course explores how scholars and others derive knowledge of the past, examine cultural practices, and construct notions of heritage through the things we leave behind. Using case studies from across the globe students will learn how this field deploys various methods and theories in pursuit of the past and its peoples.

10A

Probability & Stats (Huffman, M.)
An introduction to probability and statistics. Emphasis on a thorough understanding of the probabilistic basis of statistical inference. Emphasizes examples from sociology, anthropology, and related social science disciplines.

25A

Environmental Injustice (Fortun, K.). Course Website  (Satisfies GE Requirements III & VII)
Explores how pollution, climate change, and other environmental problems impact people around the world, often worsening social inequality. Students use social science frameworks to understand environmental problems, different interpretations of these problems, and how people have organized for political change.

41A

Global Cultures and Society (Douglas, T.)(IS is the home department for this course) (Satisfies GE Requirements III & VIII)
Offers a general overview of the rise of global interdependence in political, economic, demographic, and cultural terms. Considers what drove people from relative isolation into intensified intercourse with one another, and investigates the consequences of this shift.

125A

Economic Anthropology (Egan, J.) (xlist Econ 152A)
Economic systems in comparative perspective: production, distribution, and consumption in market and non-market societies; agricultural development in the third world.

129 (Section A)

Consumption & Culture (Straughn, I.)

Our modern "society of the spectacle" often equates your consumption to your very humanity. Explores the ways in which our desire for things expresses our identity, politics, place within society, and how what we consume dominates social life.

129 (section B)

Anthropology of Work (Zarate, S.)

The UCI campus has beautifully manicured landscapes. Our classrooms are always cleaned for us to learn together. But how often do we think of the work and workers required to make that happen? This course focuses on different kinds of labor that, although often crucial to our everyday lives, is devalued and made invisible by regimes of race, gender, and human exceptionalism. We will explore ethnographies that range from domestic work to transnational surrogacy to the entangled worlds of "human" and ecological labor. We will delve into theories of life, value, exploitation, and resistance as a way to think with but also beyond the category of labor.

134A

Medical Anthropology (Hamdy, S.) (xlist Chc/Lat 178A) (MSTS Course) (Satisfies GE Requirement VIII)
Introduces students to cross-cultural perspectives and critical theories in anthropological studies of medicine. Special attention is given to diverse ways of understanding bodies, illnesses, and therapeutic practices in our changing world.

134C

Food, Medicine, and Health (Olson, V.)
With anthropological studies of edible things as its foundation, this course explores topics related to the relationship between medical knowledge, eating, and health from a medical anthropological perspective.

134F

Anthropology of the Body (Lecture A - O'Rourke, S.)
Examines human bodies as both biological and socio-cultural entities and explores the relationship among mind, body, and society cross-culturally. Topics include embodiment; race, sex, gender and the body; somatization; control of the body; commodified bodies; and hybrid/cyborg bodies.

136G

Colonialism and Gender (Adjunct-Mallon Andrew, K.)(x-listed with IS 153D)
An anthropological enquiry into the ways colonial relations of power have been structured and gendered throughout the world, and to what effect. Examines the social locations of men and women in the everyday exercise of colonial and imperial power.

139 (section A)

Anthropology of the Paranormal (Lecture A - O'Rourke, S.)
Over the last few decades, the "Western" world's interest in the paranormal has escalated and this is reflected in the great many films and television programs on the subject. Accordingly, through the application of critical theories this course will examine the beliefs, practices, and histories of the paranormal in the context of modernity and the politics of representation. We will delve into spiritualism, hauntings, anthropologists' encounters with the paranormal, UFOs, and Bigfoot. We will study the paranormal in "Western" cultures and engage a cross-cultural investigation of the paranormal in various Asian cultures. The modern subcultures that develop around paranormal phenomena, such as ghost hunters, covens, and passionate UFO investigators, are interesting to anthropologists in their own right. However, they also provide a mirror for understanding mainstream knowledge production, and especially the relationship among science, the supernatural, the media, and the public. These critical approaches will illuminate how various sociocultural domains of knowledge and power strive to assert "truths" about the paranormal through their claims of expertise, experience, and/or objectivity.

139 (section B)

Law and Violence (Lecture B - Al-Bulushi, S.)
What does it mean to act, govern, or protest in the name of 'humanity'? What sense can we make of the idea that compassion, violence, and the law are so intimately intertwined in today's world? As states, NGOs, and international institutions are increasingly preoccupied with the question of 'security,' this class will grapple with the reality that seemingly benign entities (e.g. the United Nations) are tasked with managing and policing the populations they claim to serve. We will critically engage with the idea of a purportedly universal 'humanity,' and with the notion of humanitarianism as an ethos, a set of laws, and a form of power. At the same time, we will grapple with questions of solidarity and justice, studying the convergences and divergences between imperial and anti-imperial invocations of 'humanity.' Drawing on ethnographic texts, we will explore the cultivation of sensibilities about grievable life, and consider how race, gender, and class shape policies and popular struggles that contend with how violence is named and how it is addressed.

162B

Indians of North America (Drover, C.) (Satisfies GE Requirements VII)
A survey of indigenous peoples in North America including the Arctic, Subarctic, Pacific Northwest, Northeast, Southeast, Plains, Southwest Great Basin and California environmental zones. Contact period subsistence, social organization, geographic distributions, and political organization. Post contact sovereignty, self-determination, intergovernmental relations; cultural continuity, development of environments/resources and culture change.

163A

Peoples of the Pacific (Egan, J.)(x-listed with IS ) (Satisfies GE Requirements VIII)
The cultural history and recent developments among the Pacific peoples of Polynesia, Micronesia, Melanesia, New Guinea, and Australia

180AW

"The Woman's Body" (Anthro Major Seminar) (Section A - O'Rourke, S.) (Upper Division Writing Requirement)
This writing seminar will apply intersectionality to investigate the woman's body in the context of the politics of representation. We will critically analyze how the woman's body is represented in different media formats and their various genres. With short assignments we will experiment with writing about these relations of power in different genres. Your project for the seminar will be a research paper that critically examines the representation of the woman's body in a specific media example of greatest interest to you.

180AW

Writing Sciences (Anthro Major Seminar) (Section B - Fortun, M.) (Upper Division Writing Requirement)
Explores the complexities of the sciences and scientists – the interwoven cultural, technical, social, ethical and political dimensions of scientific worlds from laboratories to legislatures. We learn from the writings of scientists, science writers, anthropologists, and other researchers how to understand the sciences not as a disinterested pursuit of abstract eternal truth, but as a human activity fully immersed in a world of uncertainties, charged histories, scarce resources, differences of language and culture, and the harsh realities of both nature and politics. Over the course of the quarter students will develop an independent research project on a topic of their choice, building toward a short article about a scientist, a recent discovery or controversy, a health or environmental problem in need of better scientific insight, or similar topic of contemporary interest and importance.

H190B

Honors Field Research (Hamdy, S.)
Students begin or continue ethnographic field research and gain experience with a variety of data collection methods, including participant-observation, interviews, surveys, and the study of archival and documentary materials.

 

 

Winter 2021 Course Offerings

Course Number Course Title
2A (Section A)

Intro to Socio-cultural Anthro (Lec A) (Zhan, M.) (Satisfies GE Requirements III & VIII)
Introduction to cultural diversity and the methods used by anthropologists to account for it. Family relations, economic activities, politics, gender, and religion in a wide range of societies. Stresses the application of anthropological methods to research problems.

2A (Section B)

Intro to Socio-cultural Anthro (Lec B) (Egan, J.) (Satisfies GE Requirements III & VIII)
Introduction to cultural diversity and the methods used by anthropologists to account for it. Family relations, economic activities, politics, gender, and religion in a wide range of societies. Stresses the application of anthropological methods to research problems.

2A (Section C)

Intro to Socio-cultural Anthro (Lec C) (Douglas, T.) (Satisfies GE Requirements III & VIII)
Introduction to cultural diversity and the methods used by anthropologists to account for it. Family relations, economic activities, politics, gender, and religion in a wide range of societies. Stresses the application of anthropological methods to research problems.

2B

Introduction to Biological Anthropology (Egan, J.) (Satisfies GE Requirement III)
Evolutionary theory and processes, comparative primate fossil record, human variation, and the adequacy of theory, and empirical data.

10B

Probability & Statistics (Staff)
An introduction to probability and statistics. Emphasis on a thorough understanding of the probabilistic basis of statistical inference. Emphasizes examples from sociology, anthropology, and related social science disciplines.

20A

People, Cultures, and Environmental Sustainability (Egan, J.) (Satisfies GE Requirement VIII)

Anthropological consideration of global environmental sustainability from the perspective of human cultures and communities. Causes and consequences of population growth, natural resource management, environmental law, environmental ethics. Case studies emphasize tropical rain forests, arid lands of Africa and North America.

41A

Global Cultures & Society (Douglas, T.)(IS is the home department for this course) (Satisfies GE Requirements III & VIII)
Offers a general overview of the rise of global interdependence in political, economic, demographic, and cultural terms. Considers what drove people from relative isolation into intensified intercourse with one another, and investigates the consequences of this shift.

45A

Science, Culture, Power (Fortun, M) (Satisfies GE Requirement VIII)
Examines science in historical and cultural context (Scientific and Darwinian Revolutions, Manhattan Project, contemporary biosciences) to understand scientific truths and their limits, scientists as social actors, and vital intersections of sciences with religion, politics, gender, and other forms of culture.

48

Archaeology or Aliens?: Conspiracy, Pseudoscience, and the Emergence of Civilizations (Straughn, I.) (GE III & VIII)

Archaeology has inspired (and sometimes actively encouraged) various theories about aliens, lost civilizations, dark conspiracies, and mysterious technologies. Does such an intimate relationship with these fantastic notions undermine archaeology and its claims of authoritative knowledge about past cultures?

100A

Ethnography and Anthropological Methods (Olson, V.) Course Flyer
Anthropological research, learning ethnographic methods, and how to choose a research topic, construct research questions, explore library resources, collect data, and write an analytical paper on research findings.

121J

Urban Anthropology (Nam, S.) (x-listed IS 153C)

Cultural roles of urban centers and processes of urbanization in comparative perspective, focusing on both nonwestern, nonindustrial societies of past and present; the relationship between modern urban centers and Third World peoples. Migration, urban poverty, in Africa, Asia, Latin America.

125B

Ecological Anthropology (Zarate, S.)

Studies relationships between human communities and their natural environments. The role of environment in shaping culture; effects of extreme environments on human biology and social organization; anthropologist's role in studying global environmental problems, e.g., African famine, tropical rain forests destruction.

 

 

125U

Migration, Nation, and Media (Chavez, L.) (xlisted Chc/lat 123 & SPPS 101A - Social Pol and Public Service (SPPS))
Examines media shapes and reflects public opinion on immigration and its representation of immigrants, citizens, and ideas about the nation, and who belongs and who is a potential threat; as well as the relationship between scholars and journalists.

139 (127C Regularize)

 Language and the Law (Richland, J.)

Language and discourse are central features of law in any society. Whether as the subject of legal protection or exclusion, or as the mode of written law, oral argumentation, policing and enforcement, language and other forms of communication play a crucial role as the content and forms that constitute law and its social power. This course introduces students to significant works in linguistic anthropological and discourse analytic approaches to law, with particular emphasis on examples from the United States and Australia. The first weeks trace the theoretical and methodological origins of law and language studies in constructivist and interaction based approaches of sociolinguistics and linguistic anthropology. Following this introduction, three topics of law and society research are considered: the discourses of disputing and conflict talk, the texts of law and legislation, and lastly, law talk in cross-cultural perspective. The course will then review the contributions that language and language practices make in the U.S. criminal justice system – the role they play in the exercise of proper legal procedures, forms of linguistic evidence and the language practices of evidence collection, and language practices as the basis of certain kinds of criminally sanctioned behavior.

128B

 Race, Gender & Science (Staff)(x-listed CHC/LAT 176) (Satisfies GE Requirement VII)

Perfect for pre-health, science and social science majors wanting to appreciate how science and society interact. Race and gender as biological and socio-cultural constructs are examined. Questions explored: What is disease? What is science? What are social and biological differences?

128C

Digital Cultures (Boellstorff, T.)

Explores cultural and political implications of the infotech revolution and the ways new media are used around the world, new cultural practices and spaces (e.g., cybercafes), debates surrounding the meanings of these new technologies, and their implications for transforming society.

136K

Anthropology of the Body (O'Rourke, S.)
Probes culture and politics of the female body in contemporary American life. Focusing on "feminine beauty," examines diverse notions of beauty, bodily practices, and body politics embraced by American women of different classes, ethnicities, and sexualities.

138

Prisons and Public Education (Sojoyner, D.)(xlist AfAm 159)
Looks at the connections between schools and prisons in the United States. Students learn about ideas that push beyond common trope of the "school to prison pipeline.

139

Encounters and Identities (Douglas, T.)
This course is an examination of how cultural anthropologists have examined and critiqued the concept of racial and ethnic identity, particularly within the United States. Through lectures, class discussion, readings and videos, students will engage the various intersections of identity constructs such as race, nation, gender, and socio-economic class. In this course an emphasis will be placed on various theoretical developments in the discipline such as post-modern and post-colonial approaches to the study of contemporary identity formation. Course materials will draw from a wide range of sources beginning with the European conquest of the Americas in the 16th century and concluding with anthropological research from the late 20th and early 21st centuries.

139

Nationalism, Extremism and the Right(Mahmud, L.) https://canvas.eee.uci.edu/courses/32404

Do you love your country? This course examines ideologies of nationalism, patriotism, and citizenship, and their unique relations to gender, race, sexuality, ethnicity, class, and religion. Assigned readings will include classic texts on nationalism, as well as their feminist, postcolonial, and queer studies critiques. Specific topics addressed may include: metaphors of homeland, family, and domesticity; borders and movements; the relationship of gender and sexuality to conservative nationalist projects; love, terror, and the emotional life of nationalism; colonialism and imperialism; extremism, fascism, and the Right. Reading a variety of case studies, as well as theories of nationalism from anthropology and related fields, students will gain an understanding of nationalism as a cultural and political category.

141A

Ancient Civilization of Mexico and the Southwest (Drover, C.)
The prehistory and cultural evolution of the civilization which originated in Mexico, including the Olmecs, Aztecs, Toltecs, Maya, and Zapotec, as well as the Pueblos of the Southwestern U.S. Topics include the origins of food production and of the state.

147

Egyptomania (Straughn, I.)
Through an introduction to the archaeology and culture of ancient Egypt, this course examines the fascination with all things Egypt. How did it become transformed into a field of study – Egyptology – and also emerge as a commercial, artistic and even spiritual passion. From archaeologists who toil to unearth the next great tomb, to purveyors of contemporary popular culture that seek to exploit the pyramids and their mysteries for commercial success, this course explores how the Egyptian past has shaped our perception of Egypt today as well as defining ourselves as consumers of its strangeness.

169

Captain Cook's Voyage (Marcus, G) (xlist HIST 183) (Seed, P.)

This course traces the three famous voyages of Captain Cook in the Pacific Ocean during the later 18th century and through their contacts with diverse island peoples provide a perspective on how islands came to be occupied through technologies of sailing and navigation, how these people formed their own cultures, and how ocean and island ecologies affect their character even up to the present day.

180AW

Exploring Narrative (Anthro Major Seminar) (Varzi, R.)
Exploring Narrative is a writing workshop in which we will be reading form a selection of narrative styles and genres to the end of becoming better writers. We will explore ethnography, storytelling, expository essays, books on writing and participating in various writing exercises while working on a single writing project throughout the term.

180AW

Money, Sex, Power (Anthro Major Seminar) (Mahmud, L.) https://canvas.eee.uci.edu/courses/32403
This course will review anthropological and interdisciplinary scholarship on three core issues of our times: money, sex, and power. Drawing from a variety of case studies from around the globe, we will analyze how these seemingly discrete terms have emerged historically, and how they come together to form a complex web of transnational political economies, race and gender relations, erotic politics, and class struggles.
This course will run as a writing-intensive seminar. We will therefore make use of research assignments, oral presentations, and in-class activities designed to help students sharpen their analytical skills and develop new study practices in preparation for independent research, senior theses, and graduate studies.

 

H190C

Honors Research Analysis (Peterson, K.)
Students apply qualitative data analysis techniques to ethnographic data collected as part of their Honors research.

 

 

Spring 2021 Course Offerings           **Please note all Spring 2020 courses will be "Online/Remote"**

Course Number Course Title
2A (Section A)

Intro to Socio-cultural Anthro (Lec A) (Kim, E.) (Satisfies GE Requirements III & VIII)
Introduction to cultural diversity and the methods used by anthropologists to account for it. Family relations, economic activities, politics, gender, and religion in a wide range of societies. Stresses the application of anthropological methods to research problems.

2A (Section B)

Intro to Socio-cultural Anthro (Lec B) (Egan, J.) (Satisfies GE Requirements III & VIII)
Introduction to cultural diversity and the methods used by anthropologists to account for it. Family relations, economic activities, politics, gender, and religion in a wide range of societies. Stresses the application of anthropological methods to research problems.

2B

Introduction to Biological Anthropology (Egan, J.) (Satisfies GE Requirements III)
Evolutionary theory and processes, comparative primate fossil record, human variation, and the adequacy of theory, and empirical data.

2C

Intro to Archaeology (Drover, C.) (Satisfies GE Requirements III)
Archaeological theory and cultural processes with emphasis on the American Southwest, Mesoamerica, and Mesopotamia.

What the heck is the archaeological record and why does it matter? This course explores how scholars and others derive knowledge of the past, examine cultural practices, and construct notions of heritage through the things we leave behind. Using case studies from across the globe students will learn how this field deploys various methods and theories in pursuit of the past and its peoples.

2D

Intro to Language and Culture (Murphy, K.) (Satisfies GE Requirement III)
Explores what the study of language can reveal about ourselves as bearers of culture. After introducing some basic concepts, examines how cultural knowledge is linguistically organized and how language might shape our perception of the world.

10C

Probability & Stats (Staff)(Home Dept. is Soc Sci)
An introduction to probability and statistics. Emphasis on a thorough understanding of the probabilistic basis of statistical inference. Emphasizes examples from sociology, anthropology, and related social science disciplines.

30A

Global Issues in Anthropological Perspective (Douglas, T.) (Satisfies GE Requirement VIII)

Explores anthropological perspectives on issues of importance in an increasingly global society. Topics include emphases on ethnic conflict; identity; immigration and citizenship; religion and religious diversity; medical anthropology; legal anthropology; development and economic change; gender.

41A

Global Cultures & Society (Douglas, T.)(IS is the home department for this course) (Satisfies GE Requirements III & VIII)
Offers a general overview of the rise of global interdependence in political, economic, demographic, and cultural terms. Considers what drove people from relative isolation into intensified intercourse with one another, and investigates the consequences of this shift.

100A

Ethnography and Anthropological Methods (Hundle, A.) Course Flyer
Anthropological research, learning ethnographic methods, and how to choose a research topic, construct research questions, explore library resources, collect data, and write an analytical paper on research findings.

100B Cancelled

Anthropology Careers (Richland, J.) Cancelled in Spring 2021 will be listed for Spring 2022

Gives students the skills and perspective needed to leverage undergraduate anthropology education in diverse career domains. Students explore different career domains (health care, tech development, environmental governance, etc.) and learn to represent themselves professionally.

121AW

Kinship and Social Organization (Egan, J.) (Upper Division Writing Requirement)

Organization of social life primarily in preindustrial societies. Theories of kinship, marriage regulations, sexual behavior, and social roles. Comparisons of biological, psychological, sociological, and economic explanations of social organization.

121D

Cross-Cultural Studies in Gender (Mahmud, L.)(xlist IS 153B) (Fulfills GE VII Multicultural) https://canvas.eee.uci.edu/courses/35974

Explores the construction of gender in national and transnational contexts. Special attention is given to how race, sexuality, class, and global inequalities shape different experiences of gender, and how gender structures political, institutional, and social life across the world.

125

Anthropology of Debt (Straughn, I.)

The United States has accumulated a $20+ trillion national debt. A commercial for the financial company
Experian declares: "Credit isn't just a score, it's a skill." Those striving for an education face a student loan
burden in the US that surpasses more than a trillion dollars. How is this sustainable and are there any
alternatives? This course argues that debt, whether financial or in some other form, has shaped culture
across varied contexts geographically and historically. It examines the ways that cultures have, in fact, 
naturalized indebtedness, taken it for granted as a fact of life and even a skill to be valued. Such 
indebtedness, whether to other people (or society more generally), to God (the gods), or to impersonal 
institutions such as banks or the state, serves to structure social relations at all levels (and even into the
hereafter). As the course proceeds, we will consider how debt becomes entangled with all manner of
cultural phenomena: slavery, hierarchy, consumption, markets, ritual practice, racism, gender and, of course, education. Finally as we work to denaturalize debt, the course reflects on practices that either undermine the power of debt, restrain it and perhaps might offer hope for some future jubilee, a clean financial slate, such as occurred in ancient times. Does anthropology provide tools and concepts for imagining a society in which we are more than just a credit score, a credit risk or a vehicle for carrying the debts of the past into the future?

128A

Science, Technology, Controversy 
Explores ways in which the social sciences conceive of science as a sociocultural practice. Emphasis on literature in Science and Technology Studies (STS), especially writings that concern the relationship of science to space and place, power, and politics.

132A

Psychological Anthropology (O'Rourke, S.) (xlist Psych 173A)(MSTS Course)

Cultural differences and similarities in personality and behavior. Child-rearing practices and consequent adult personality characteristics, biocultural aspects of child development and attachment, culture and behavior evolutionary models, politically linked personality, cognitive anthropology, psychology of narrative forms, comparative national character studies.

134A

Medical Anthropology (Hamdy, S.)(xlist Chc/Lat 178A)(MSTS Course)(Satisfies GE Requirement VIII)
Introduces students to cross-cultural perspectives and critical theories in anthropological studies of medicine. Special attention is given to diverse ways of understanding bodies, illnesses, and therapeutic practices in our changing world.

134B

Cultures of Biomedicine (Fletcher, E.)

An introduction to the anthropolobical study of biomedicine and biotechnology. Topics include medicalization, experimentation and discovery, diagnosis, expertise, health activism, and biotechnology.

136A

Nationalism and Ethnicity in the Contemporary World (O'Rourke, S.)(xlisted with IS 153E)(Satisfies GE Requirement VIII)

An exploration of the concepts of identity, culture, ethnicity, race, and nation through ethnographic cases, with a view to asking larger questions: how do people create nativeness and foreignness? How does "culture" get worked into contemporary racisms and nationalisms?

136B

History of Anthropological Theory (Douglas, T.)
Provides foundational knowledge in the discipline of anthropology by reviewing competing approaches in anthropological theory, from the nineteenth century to the present. Covers historically fundamental approaches—social evolutionism, functionalism—and recent movements such as feminism, cultural studies, poststructuralism, and postmodernism.

139

Global Themes in Sikh Studies (Hundle, A.)

Sikh Studies is an interdisciplinary field of study that is connected to religious studies, Punjab/diaspora studies, and area studies field of South Asia studies. Most scholars agree that the question of "what is Sikh Studies" is an open one that is not self-evident. There have been debates, spanning the South Asian subcontinent and among diaspora intellectuals in the West, which have tried to fix and define what the field is, question what kinds of relations of power are bound up within it, and expand what its disciplinary and theoretical focus and geographical scope should be. In this course, we will approach "Sikh Studies" as a combination of the academic study of Sikhism (a religious, philosophical and ethical tradition), Sikh communities (collectivities organized around the tradition), and the always shifting and changing circumstances and possibilities of "Sikh life"—all according to global and interdisciplinary perspectives. As a class, we will attend to critical and contemporary topics in the field, with attention to the historical and continued development of the field. We will also attend to the development of the field via anthropological approaches and methodologies.

139

Policymaking & Geopolitics (Al-Bulushi, S.)

Despite the formal end of colonial rule, the forms of knowledge through which global policymaking is apprehended and explained continue to be dominated by Euro-American scholars, 'experts,' and paradigms. If and when people and places in the Global South receive attention, they are often analyzed only in relation to the strategic interests and practices of powerful states. As such, Global South populations provide the data for Global North-based theories but are rarely recognized as theorists or practitioners of policy and so-called 'global' challenges themselves. Through engagement with ethnographic work on the one hand, and Global South thought on the other, this course employs an interdisciplinary approach to decolonize the study of policymaking and geopolitics.

139

 

Disability & Culture (Riley, T.)

This course delves deep into the study of disability and culture. It will critically examine the concept of dis-/ability and shed light on the ableism inherent in cultural formations of bodily differences. In addition to considering disability and theories of race, sex, gender, and sexuality, the course will examine key literature on the body in culture from anthropological and other perspectives, including history, philosophy, medicine, and media. Students will be asked to consider these perspectives in terms of how they intersect, and how they can be critically engaged with in a complex and unequal world.

148 (Moved to Fall 2021)

 I Dig UCI (Straughn, I.) This course has an in person lab component, so it will not be offered this Spring. We will offer it for Fall 2021.

An introduction to archaeological fieldwork through participation in an active excavation on campus. Students engage with research design and learn the foundational methods of archaeological recovery: survey, mapping, sampling strategies, documentation, excavation, artifact identification, and interpretation.

180AW

Writing Ethnography (Anthro Major Seminar) (Marcus, G.)

180AW

 Urban Utopias-Dystopias (Anthro Major Seminar) (Nam, S.) originally listed as Urban Ethnography

 

 H190A

 Honors Research Design (Bernal, V.)

Students design a research project and articulate its goals and significance. Written work consists of a research proposal describing the research questions, the relevant literature, methods of data collection and analysis, and ethical considerations 

 H190W

 Honors Thesis Writing (Varzi, R.)

Students draft a senior honors thesis (typically) with the following sections: problem statement, literature review, ethnographic background, and descriptions of the methods, results, and conclusions.

 


 

 

Summer Session I 2021 Course Offerings             **Please note all Fall 2020 courses will be "Online/Remote"**

Course Number Course Title
2A

Intro to Sociocultural Anthro (Lec A) (Cox, K.) (Satisfies GE Requirements III & VIII)

What does grocery shopping tell us about politics? How can mimicking goats help us think about climate change? What do contemporary theories of sexual orientation teach us about autism advocacy? These are all questions for sociocultural anthropologists. In Anthro 2A, you'll learn to "think like an anthropologist" about topics including race, gender, disability, the environment, and healthcare, exploring these and other questions in the process.

2B

Intro to Biological Anthrpology (Egan, J.) (Satisfies GE Requirements III)

Evolutionary theory and processes, comparative primate fossil record, human variation, and the adequacy of theory, and empirical data.

25A

Environmental Injustice (Fortun, K.)(Satisfies GE Requirements III & VII)

Explores how pollution, climate change, and other environmental problems impact people around the world, often worsening social inequality. Students use social science frameworks to understand environmental problems, different interpretations of these problems, and how people have organized for political change. Anthro25A website | Anthro 25A poster | Anthro 25A video preview

121AW

Kinship & Social Organization (O'Rourke, S.) (Satisfies Upper Division Writing Requirement) 

Through narrated powerpoint lectures, readings, and documentary and narrative films, this course will study the organization of social life from preindustrial to postindustrial societies. Our focus will be on kinship, marriage, family life and the complexities of social roles and identities therein. We will delve into anthropology's classical theories of kinship, in addition to post-structural theories, intersectional feminism, and post/trans humanism. As this is an upper-division writing course there will be short, warm up writing assignments that all will share and comment on, and your main project will be a five page research paper on any topic in the study of kinship, marriage, and family life that you find most interesting.

125A

Economic Anthropology (Yolmon, N.) xlisted with Econ 152A

"It's the economy, stupid." This was Bill Clinton's unofficial campaign slogan in 1992, as the US economy was heading into a recession. Today, once again, the economy as we know it is changing rapidly. This upper division seminar will explore how we learn to value objects (what's up with all the toilet paper hoarding?), how we act as economic subjects (how will immunity certificates influence our behavior?), and what the future of money could look like (will cash survive, or will digital currencies reign supreme?) This class will cover basic theories in Economic Anthropology while relating them to our post-COVID-19 world. Note: you do not need any math skills to take this class!

136K

Woman and the Body (Wenger, S.)(Satisfies GE Requirement VII)

Probes culture and politics of the female body in contemporary American life. Focusing on "feminine beauty," examines diverse notions of beauty, bodily practices, and body politics embraced by American women of different classes, ethnicities, and sexualities.

 


 

 

Summer Session II 2021 Course Offerings             **Please note all Fall 2020 courses will be "Online/Remote"**

Course Number Course Title

2A 

 

Intro to Sociocultural Anthro (Palmer, J.) (Satisfies GE Requirements III & VIII)

One-celled animals are the only ones who experience reality as it is. For the rest of us, our senses get censored. Culture mediates between human senses and the world. So, what if we became experts at "seeing" culture itself? Imagine being blind, then acquiring some blurry vision, then getting glasses to correct that vision and seeing clearly for the first time. What would the next step be? X-ray vision? Nope. It would be... Socio-Cultural Anthropology!

2D

Language & Culture (Middleton, C.)(clmiddle@uci.edu) (Satisfies GE Requirements III)

Specifically designed to be taken online and asynchronously, this course explores what the study of language can reveal about ourselves as bearers of culture. After introducing some basic concepts, this course examines how cultural knowledge is linguistically organized and how language might shape our perception of the world. Using examples from around the world and the United States, this course will examine how language affects cultural domains, such as community, identity, power, and media. No previous knowledge of anthropology or linguistics is necessary.

30A

Global Issues Anthropology Perspective (Kohler, G.) (Satisfies GE Requirement VIII)

Explores anthropological perspectives on issues of importance in an increasingly global society. Topics include emphases on ethnic conflict; identity; immigration and citizenship; religion and religious diversity; medical anthropology; legal anthropology; development and economic change; gender.

125X 

Transnational Migration (Zelnick, J.)(jzelnick@uci.edu)(xlisted with CHLT 161 - Chicano/Latino Studies (CHC/LAT) (Satisfies GE VIII)(virtual remote, hybrid asynchronous/synchronous)

Why do people migrate? This course will examine anthropological theories about the causes and continuation of international migration. Using detailed empirical studies and ethnographies, we will explore the following themes: citizenship and nationality; transnationalism; the law; nationalism, nativism, racism, and discrimination; refugees and asylum; race, gender, and class; and deportation. While examples will be drawn from the United States, Latin America, Asia, Africa, and Europe, particular focus will be placed on the U.S.-Mexico border and Southeast Asian American migration.

 128B

Race, Gender & Science (Wilkinson, A.)(xlisted with CHLT 176) (Satisfies GE Requirement VII)

Perfect for pre-health, science and social science majors wanting to appreciate how science and society interact. Race and gender as biological and socio-cultural constructs are examined. Questions explored: What is disease? What is science? What are social and biological differences?

134A

Medical Anthropology (Hamdy, S.) (xlist Chc/Lat 178A) (MSTS Course) (Satisfies GE Requirement VIII)
Introduces students to cross-cultural perspectives and critical theories in anthropological studies of medicine. Special attention is given to diverse ways of understanding bodies, illnesses, and therapeutic practices in our changing world.

162A

Peoples and Cultues of Latin America (Richart, R.)(rrichart@uci.edu)(Satisfies GE Requirement VIII)

This course introduces students to the culturally and linguistically diverse geographic region now known as Latin America, and to some of the works and debates that comprise Latin American cultural anthropology. For the most part, this class directs its attention to contemporary Latin
American cultures and societies. Themes will include concepts of race, ethnicity and gender; political and economic processes; transnational migration; and social movements. The aim of this course is to expose students to some of the central concerns of Latin American anthropology.

 


 

 


 

 

Fall Quarter 2021 Course Offerings

Course Number Course Title
2A (Section A)

Intro to Socio-cultural Anthro (Lec A) (Douglas, T.) (Satisfies GE Requirements III & VIII) Virtual Remote
Introduction to cultural diversity and the methods used by anthropologists to account for it. Family relations, economic activities, politics, gender, and religion in a wide range of societies. Stresses the application of anthropological methods to research problems.

2A (Section B)

Intro to Socio-cultural Anthro (Lec A) (Egan, J.) (Satisfies GE Requirements III & VIII) Virtual Remote
Introduction to cultural diversity and the methods used by anthropologists to account for it. Family relations, economic activities, politics, gender, and religion in a wide range of societies. Stresses the application of anthropological methods to research problems.

2B

Introduction to Biological Anthropology (Egan, J.) (Satisfies GE Requirements III) Virtural Remote
Evolutionary theory and processes, comparative primate fossil record, human variation, and the adequacy of theory, and empirical data.

2C

Intro to Archaeology (Straughn, I.) (Satisfies GE Requirement III) Virtual Remote
What the heck is the archaeological record and why does it matter? This course explores how scholars and others derive knowledge of the past, examine cultural practices, and construct notions of heritage through the things we leave behind. Using case studies from across the globe students will learn how this field deploys various methods and theories in pursuit of the past and its peoples.

10A

Probability & Stats (Huffman, M.) Virtual Remote
An introduction to probability and statistics. Emphasis on a thorough understanding of the probabilistic basis of statistical inference. Emphasizes examples from sociology, anthropology, and related social science disciplines.

25A

Environmental Injustice (Fortun, K.)(Satisfies GE Requirements III & VII) Hybrid course for Fall 2021

Explores how pollution, climate change, and other environmental problems impact people around the world, often worsening social inequality. Students use social science frameworks to understand environmental problems, different interpretations of these problems, and how people have organized for political change. Anthro25A website | Anthro 25A poster | Anthro 25A video preview

41A

Global Cultures and Society (Douglas, T.)(IS is the home department for this course) (Satisfies GE Requirements III & VIII) Virtual Remote
Offers a general overview of the rise of global interdependence in political, economic, demographic, and cultural terms. Considers what drove people from relative isolation into intensified intercourse with one another, and investigates the consequences of this shift.

100A

Ethnography and Anthropological Methods (Peterson, K.) Course Flyer Virtual Remote
Anthropological research, learning ethnographic methods, and how to choose a research topic, construct research questions, explore library resources, collect data, and write an analytical paper on research findings.

128B

Race, Gender & Science (Riley, T.)(x-listed CHC/LAT 176) (Satisfies GE Requirement VII) Virtual Remote

Perfect for pre-health, science and social science majors wanting to appreciate how science and society interact. Race and gender as biological and socio-cultural constructs are examined. Questions explored: What is disease? What is science? What are social and biological differences?

134A Medical Anthropology (Riley, T.) (xlist Chc/Lat 178A) (MSTS Course) (Satisfies GE Requirement VIII) Virtual Remote
Introduces students to cross-cultural perspectives and critical theories in anthropological studies of medicine. Special attention is given to diverse ways of understanding bodies, illnesses, and therapeutic practices in our changing world.
134F Anthropology of the Body (Lecture A - O'Rourke, S.) Virtual Remote
Examines human bodies as both biological and socio-cultural entities and explores the relationship among mind, body, and society cross-culturally. Topics include embodiment; race, sex, gender and the body; somatization; control of the body; commodified bodies; and hybrid/cyborg bodies.
139 (Section A)

Science & Myth (Fortun, M.) (Course is awaiting GE approval) Hybrid course for Fall 2021
Cultural studies of historical episodes and contemporary topics in the physical and life sciences, dissecting sometimes productive, sometimes corrosive entanglements of scientific truth with mythic and related cultural narratives of heroes, quests, supernaturalism, and dangerous powers.

139 (Section B)

Disability & Culture (Riley, T.) (In person course for Fall 2021)

This course delves deep into the study of disability and culture. It will critically examine the concept of dis-/ability and shed light on the ableism inherent in cultural formations of bodily differences. In addition to considering disability and theories of race, sex, gender, and sexuality, the course will examine key literature on the body in culture from anthropological and other perspectives, including history, philosophy, medicine, and media. Students will be asked to consider these perspectives in terms of how they intersect, and how they can be critically engaged with in a complex and unequal world.

139 (Section C) Encounters and Identities (Douglas, T.) Virtual Remote
This course is an examination of how cultural anthropologists have examined and critiqued the concept of racial and ethnic identity, particularly within the United States. Through lectures, class discussion, readings and videos, students will engage the various intersections of identity constructs such as race, nation, gender, and socio-economic class. In this course an emphasis will be placed on various theoretical developments in the discipline such as post-modern and post-colonial approaches to the study of contemporary identity formation. Course materials will draw from a wide range of sources beginning with the European conquest of the Americas in the 16th century and concluding with anthropological research from the late 20th and early 21st centuries.
139 (Section D) Law and Violence (Lecture B - Al-Bulushi, S.) Hybrid course for Fall 2021
What does it mean to act, govern, or protest in the name of 'humanity'? What sense can we make of the idea that compassion, violence, and the law are so intimately intertwined in today's world? As states, NGOs, and international institutions are increasingly preoccupied with the question of 'security,' this class will grapple with the reality that seemingly benign entities (e.g. the United Nations) are tasked with managing and policing the populations they claim to serve. We will critically engage with the idea of a purportedly universal 'humanity,' and with the notion of humanitarianism as an ethos, a set of laws, and a form of power. At the same time, we will grapple with questions of solidarity and justice, studying the convergences and divergences between imperial and anti-imperial invocations of 'humanity.' Drawing on ethnographic texts, we will explore the cultivation of sensibilities about grievable life, and consider how race, gender, and class shape policies and popular struggles that contend with how violence is named and how it is addressed.
139 (Section E)

Urban Anthropology (Sojoyner, D.)(dsojoyne@uci.edu) (x-listed IS 153C) Virtual Remote

The urban anthropologist, out in the big city, clawing amidst the calamity and multiple layers that add complexity to people's lives. However, what is the point of urban anthropology? Rather than an existential question, an emphasis of this course is to cull through the history of the field and understand the very oft-problematic stance of urban anthropology to racialized, gendered and sexed populations in the United States. With a firm grasp of the history, we will then move forward and analyze the somewhat uneven development of the field through the lens of urban anthropological texts. Immersed within the belief that a multifaceted analysis is needed to analyze the field of urban anthropology, this course is designed to introduce students to both the methodological and practical impact(s) of conducting and writing ethnography.

139 (Section F)

Comics & Medicine (Hamdy, S) Virtual Remote

More and more patients have narrated their illness experiences in comics format, exploiting the
medium to push beyond textual representations of pain and suffering. Visualizing illness offers
therapeutic effects both for producer and reader and helps to make medical experiences more
accessible and understandable to others beyond their own immediate experiences. In this class we
will explore major medical anthropology themes through comics, including chronic illness, social
determinants of health, mental health, disability, and medicalization. We will analyze how the comics
medium lends new insight into different medical experiences and we will also work to produce our
own comics to bring greater awareness to issues of health and social justice. No artistic experience or
talent is required.

148 I Dig UCI (Straughn, I.) This course has an in person lab component. 

An introduction to archaeological fieldwork through participation in an active excavation on campus. Students engage with research design and learn the foundational methods of archaeological recovery: survey, mapping, sampling strategies, documentation, excavation, artifact identification, and interpretation.

162B Indians of North America (Drover, C.) (Satisfies GE Requirements VII) Virtual Remote
A survey of indigenous peoples in North America including the Arctic, Subarctic, Pacific Northwest, Northeast, Southeast, Plains, Southwest Great Basin and California environmental zones. Contact period subsistence, social organization, geographic distributions, and political organization. Post contact sovereignty, self-determination, intergovernmental relations; cultural continuity, development of environments/resources and culture change.
163A Peoples of the Pacific (Egan, J.)(x-listed with IS 158B ) (Satisfies GE Requirements VIII) This is a hybrid course for Fall 2021
The cultural history and recent developments among the Pacific peoples of Polynesia, Micronesia, Melanesia, New Guinea, and Australia
H190B Honors Field Research (Jenks, A.)
Students begin or continue ethnographic field research and gain experience with a variety of data collection methods, including participant-observation, interviews, surveys, and the study of archival and documentary materials
180AW (Section A) Exploring Narrative (Anthro Major Seminar) (Varzi, R.)(Upper Division Writing Requirement) This is a Hybrid course for Fall 2021. Please make sure you will be able to attend on campus if requested by the instructor.
Exploring Narrative is a writing workshop in which we will be reading form a selection of narrative styles and genres to the end of becoming better writers. We will explore ethnography, storytelling, expository essays, books on writing and participating in various writing exercises while working on a single writing project throughout the term.
180AW (Section B) "The Woman's Body" (Anthro Major Seminar) (Section A - O'Rourke, S.) (Upper Division Writing Requirement) Virtual Remote
This writing seminar will apply intersectionality to investigate the woman's body in the context of the politics of representation. We will critically analyze how the woman's body is represented in different media formats and their various genres. With short assignments we will experiment with writing about these relations of power in different genres. Your project for the seminar will be a research paper that critically examines the representation of the woman's body in a specific media example of greatest interest to you.

 


 

 

Winter Quarter 2022 Course Offerings

Course Number Course Title
2A (Section A)

Intro to Socio-cultural Anthro (Lec A) (Kim, E.) (Satisfies GE Requirements III & VIII)
Introduction to cultural diversity and the methods used by anthropologists to account for it. Family relations, economic activities, politics, gender, and religion in a wide range of societies. Stresses the application of anthropological methods to research problems.

2A (Section B)

Intro to Socio-cultural Anthro (Lec A) (Douglas, T.) (Satisfies GE Requirements III & VIII)
Introduction to cultural diversity and the methods used by anthropologists to account for it. Family relations, economic activities, politics, gender, and religion in a wide range of societies. Stresses the application of anthropological methods to research problems.

2B

Introduction to Biological Anthropology (Egan, J.) (Satisfies GE Requirements III)
Evolutionary theory and processes, comparative primate fossil record, human variation, and the adequacy of theory, and empirical data.

20A

People, Cultures, and Environmental Sustainability (Egan, J.) (Satisfies GE Requirement VIII)

Anthropological consideration of global environmental sustainability from the perspective of human cultures and communities. Causes and consequences of population growth, natural resource management, environmental law, environmental ethics. Case studies emphasize tropical rain forests, arid lands of Africa and North America.

100A

Ethnography and Anthropological Methods (Douglas, T.) Course Flyer
Anthropological research, learning ethnographic methods, and how to choose a research topic, construct research questions, explore library resources, collect data, and write an analytical paper on research findings.

121D

Cross-Cultural Studies in Gender (Mahmud, L.) (Fulfills GE VII Multicultural) https://canvas.eee.uci.edu/courses/24194

Explores the construction of gender in national and transnational contexts. Special attention is given to how race, sexuality, class, and global inequalities shape different experiences of gender, and how gender structures political, institutional, and social life across the world.

121J Urban Anthropology (Nam, S.) 

Cultural roles of urban centers and processes of urbanization in comparative perspective, focusing on both nonwestern, nonindustrial societies of past and present; the relationship between modern urban centers and Third World peoples. Migration, urban poverty, in Africa, Asia, Latin America.

New 125AW (Fortun)  Interdisciplinary Environmental Justice Research (meets with Grad course) (Fortun, K.) waiting for approval will count for upper division writing
125A Economic Anthropology (Egan, J.) (xlist Econ 152A)
Economic systems in comparative perspective: production, distribution, and consumption in market and non-market societies; agricultural development in the third world.
128A  Science, Technology, Controversy (Riley, T.)

Explores ways in which the social sciences conceive of science as a sociocultural practice. Emphasis on literature in Science and Technology Studies (STS), especially writings that concern the relationship of science to space and place, power, and politics. .

134A Medical Anthropology (Riley, T.) (xlist Chc/Lat 178A) (MSTS Course) (Satisfies GE Requirement VIII) 
Introduces students to cross-cultural perspectives and critical theories in anthropological studies of medicine. Special attention is given to diverse ways of understanding bodies, illnesses, and therapeutic practices in our changing world.
136K

The Woman and the Body (O'Rourke, S.)(Satisfies GE Requirement VII)

Probes culture and politics of the female body in contemporary American life. Focusing on "feminine beauty," examines diverse notions of beauty, bodily practices, and body politics embraced by American women of different classes, ethnicities, and sexualities.

138

Prisons and Public Education (Sojoyner, D.)(xlist AfAm 159)
Looks at the connections between schools and prisons in the United States. Students learn about ideas that push beyond common trope of the "school to prison pipeline.

139 (Section A)

Sexualities & Culture (Riley, T.)

 

139 (Section B) Encounters and Identities (Douglas, T.)
This course is an examination of how cultural anthropologists have examined and critiqued the concept of racial and ethnic identity, particularly within the United States. Through lectures, class discussion, readings and videos, students will engage the various intersections of identity constructs such as race, nation, gender, and socio-economic class. In this course an emphasis will be placed on various theoretical developments in the discipline such as post-modern and post-colonial approaches to the study of contemporary identity formation. Course materials will draw from a wide range of sources beginning with the European conquest of the Americas in the 16th century and concluding with anthropological research from the late 20th and early 21st centuries.
141A Ancient Civilization of Mexico and the Southwest (Drover, C.)
The prehistory and cultural evolution of the civilization which originated in Mexico, including the Olmecs, Aztecs, Toltecs, Maya, and Zapotec, as well as the Pueblos of the Southwestern U.S. Topics include the origins of food production and of the state.
149 (Section A)

Archaeology of California (Lowman, C.)

 

149 (Section B)

Migrants and Migration in Archaeology (Lowman, C.)

 

169 (Section A)

Captain Cook's Voyage (Marcus, G) (xlist HIST 183) (Seed, P.)

This course traces the three famous voyages of Captain Cook in the Pacific Ocean during the later 18th century and through their contacts with diverse island peoples provide a perspective on how islands came to be occupied through technologies of sailing and navigation, how these people formed their own cultures, and how ocean and island ecologies affect their character even up to the present day.

H190C

Honors Research Analysis (Jenks, A.)

 

 


 

 

Spring Quarter 2022 Course Offerings

Course Number Course Title
2A (Section A)

Intro to Socio-cultural Anthro (Lec A) (Zhan, M.) (Satisfies GE Requirements III & VIII)
Introduction to cultural diversity and the methods used by anthropologists to account for it. Family relations, economic activities, politics, gender, and religion in a wide range of societies. Stresses the application of anthropological methods to research problems.

2A (Section B)

Intro to Socio-cultural Anthro (Lec A) (Douglas, T.) (Satisfies GE Requirements III & VIII)
Introduction to cultural diversity and the methods used by anthropologists to account for it. Family relations, economic activities, politics, gender, and religion in a wide range of societies. Stresses the application of anthropological methods to research problems.

2A (Section C)

Intro to Socio-cultural Anthro (Lec A) (Egan, J.) (Satisfies GE Requirements III & VIII)
Introduction to cultural diversity and the methods used by anthropologists to account for it. Family relations, economic activities, politics, gender, and religion in a wide range of societies. Stresses the application of anthropological methods to research problems.

2B

Introduction to Biological Anthropology (Egan, J.) (Satisfies GE Requirements III)
Evolutionary theory and processes, comparative primate fossil record, human variation, and the adequacy of theory, and empirical data.

2C

Intro to Archaeology (Drover, C.) (Satisfies GE Requirement III)
What the heck is the archaeological record and why does it matter? This course explores how scholars and others derive knowledge of the past, examine cultural practices, and construct notions of heritage through the things we leave behind. Using case studies from across the globe students will learn how this field deploys various methods and theories in pursuit of the past and its peoples.

2D

Intro to Language and Culture (Murphy, K.) (Satisfies GE Requirement III)
Explores what the study of language can reveal about ourselves as bearers of culture. After introducing some basic concepts, examines how cultural knowledge is linguistically organized and how language might shape our perception of the world.

30A Global Issues in Anthropological Perspective (Douglas, T.) (Satisfies GE Requirement VIII)

Explores anthropological perspectives on issues of importance in an increasingly global society. Topics include emphases on ethnic conflict; identity; immigration and citizenship; religion and religious diversity; medical anthropology; legal anthropology; development and economic change; gender.

60 new sikh studies course

Sikh Religin, Culture and Ethnicity (Hundle, A.)

 

100B Anthropology Careers (Nam, S.)

Gives students the skills and perspective needed to leverage undergraduate anthropology education in diverse career domains. Students explore different career domains (health care, tech development, environmental governance, etc.) and learn to represent themselves professionally.

121AW Kinship and Social Organization (Egan, J.) (Upper Division Writing Requirement)

Organization of social life primarily in preindustrial societies. Theories of kinship, marriage regulations, sexual behavior, and social roles. Comparisons of biological, psychological, sociological, and economic explanations of social organization.

125Z

Arabs and Muslims in the US

Offers a critical academic study of Islam in America, focusing on the core tenets of belief, the diversity of practices, and historical transformations that have taken place since the arrival of Muslims in the United States.

128B

Race, Gender & Science (Riley, T.)(x-listed CHC/LAT 176) (Satisfies GE Requirement VII) 

Perfect for pre-health, science and social science majors wanting to appreciate how science and society interact. Race and gender as biological and socio-cultural constructs are examined. Questions explored: What is disease? What is science? What are social and biological differences?

129 subject American Material Culture actual Title TBD (Lowman, C.)
129 Museums & the Heritage Industry (Lowman, C.)
132A

Psychological Anthropology (O'Rourke, S.) (xlist Psych 173A)(MSTS Course)

Cultural differences and similarities in personality and behavior. Child-rearing practices and consequent adult personality characteristics, biocultural aspects of child development and attachment, culture and behavior evolutionary models, politically linked personality, cognitive anthropology, psychology of narrative forms, comparative national character studies.

134A Medical Anthropology (Hamdy.) (xlist Chc/Lat 178A) (MSTS Course) (Satisfies GE Requirement VIII) 
Introduces students to cross-cultural perspectives and critical theories in anthropological studies of medicine. Special attention is given to diverse ways of understanding bodies, illnesses, and therapeutic practices in our changing world.
134B

Cultures of Biomedicine (Riley, T.)

An introduction to the anthropolobical study of biomedicine and biotechnology. Topics include medicalization, experimentation and discovery, diagnosis, expertise, health activism, and biotechnology.

136G

Colonialism & Gender (Riley, T.)

An anthropological enquiry into the ways colonial relations of power have been structured and gendered throughout the world, and to what effect. Examines the social locations of men and women in the everyday exercise of colonial and imperial power.

139 (Section A) New sikh studies course

Global Themes in Sikh Studies (Hundle, A.)

 

139 (Section B)

Policymaking & Geopolitics (Al-Bulushi, S.)
This course adopts an anthropological lens to analyze the theory, practice, and politics of policy-making in a globalized world. Anthropologists increasingly write from inside policy ‘communities,’ meaning that they have participated in the crafting and implementation of laws and policies. We will explore what it means to study policy anthropologically, turning our attention to the everyday practices of professionals working in the realms of economic development, migration, and security. The class will rely on ethnographic texts to analyze the construction of authoritative knowledge and expertise, and the role of race, class, and gender in global policy-making.

139 (Section C)

Plants, People & Power (Olson, V. & Peterson, K.)

139 (Section D)

Anthropology of the Paranormal (Lecture A - O'Rourke, S.)
Over the last few decades, the "Western" world's interest in the paranormal has escalated and this is reflected in the great many films and television programs on the subject. Accordingly, through the application of critical theories this course will examine the beliefs, practices, and histories of the paranormal in the context of modernity and the politics of representation. We will delve into spiritualism, hauntings, anthropologists' encounters with the paranormal, UFOs, and Bigfoot. We will study the paranormal in "Western" cultures and engage a cross-cultural investigation of the paranormal in various Asian cultures. The modern subcultures that develop around paranormal phenomena, such as ghost hunters, covens, and passionate UFO investigators, are interesting to anthropologists in their own right. However, they also provide a mirror for understanding mainstream knowledge production, and especially the relationship among science, the supernatural, the media, and the public. These critical approaches will illuminate how various sociocultural domains of knowledge and power strive to assert "truths" about the paranormal through their claims of expertise, experience, and/or objectivity.

139 (Section E) Museums & the Heritage Industry (Lowman, C.)

180AW (Section A)

Anthro Majors Writing Seminar (Mahmud, L.)

180AW (Section B)

Anthro Majors Writing Seminar "Disabilty & Society" (Boellstorff, T.)

H190A

Honors Research Design (Marcus, G.)

H190W

Honors Thesis Writing (Staff)

259A

Anth 259A Dissertation Writing Seminar
This seminar will run as a writing workshop for students at all stages of their dissertation research. From qualifying exam documents and proposals to dissertation chapters and articles, this class will be a space to think through our writing. Weekly meetings will include discussions of writing goals and practices, ethnographic genres and audiences, as well as dedicated time to write together and offer peer review.
Canvas Link: https://canvas.eee.uci.edu/courses/45754

 

© UC Irvine School of Social Sciences - 3151 Social Sciences Plaza, Irvine, CA 92697-5100 - 949.824.2766