COURSE OFFERINGS

Please note, this is a tentative list of course offerings and is subject to change.
Last updated April 17, 2019.

For the most current listing, see http://websoc.reg.uci.edu/perl/WebSoc.

 

Fall 2019 Course Offerings

Course Number
 
Course Title
2A

Introduction to Sociocultural Anthropology (Lec A - Bernal, V.)
Introduction to cultural diversity and the methods used by anthropologists to account for it. Family relations, economic activities, politics, gender, and religion in a wide range of societies. Stresses the application of anthropological methods to research problems.

2A

Introduction to Sociocultural Anthropology (Lec B - Douglas, T.)
Introduction to cultural diversity and the methods used by anthropologists to account for it. Family relations, economic activities, politics, gender, and religion in a wide range of societies. Stresses the application of anthropological methods to research problems.

2B

Introduction to Biological Anthropology (Egan, J.)
Evolutionary theory and processes, comparative primate fossil record, human variation, and the adequacy of theory, and empirical data.

2C

Intro to Archaeology (Drover, C.)
Archaeological theory and cultural processes with emphasis on the American Southwest, Mesoamerica, and Mesopotamia.

10A

Probability & Stats (Huffman, M.)
An introduction to probability and statistics. Emphasis on a thorough understanding of the probabilistic basis of statistical inference. Emphasizes examples from sociology, anthropology, and related social science disciplines.

25A

Environmental Injustice (Fortun, K.). Course Website
Explores how pollution, climate change, and other environmental problems impact people around the world, often worsening social inequality. Students use social science frameworks to understand environmental problems, different interpretations of these problems, and how people have organized for political change.

41A

Global Cultures and Society (Douglas, T.)
Offers a general overview of the rise of global interdependence in political, economic, demographic, and cultural terms. Considers what drove people from relative isolation into intensified intercourse with one another, and investigates the consequences of this shift.

100A

Ethnography and Anthropological Methods (Section A - Peterson, K.) Course Flyer
Anthropological research, learning ethnographic methods, and how to choose a research topic, construct research questions, explore library resources, collect data, and write an analytical paper on research findings.

100A

Ethnography and Anthropological Methods (Section B - Hundle, A.) Course Flyer
Anthropological research, learning ethnographic methods, and how to choose a research topic, construct research questions, explore library resources, collect data, and write an analytical paper on research findings.

125A

Economic Anthropology (Egan, J.) (xlist Econ 152A)
Economic systems in comparative perspective: production, distribution, and consumption in market and non-market societies; agricultural development in the third world.

132A

Psychological Anthropology (O'Rourke, S.)
Cultural differences and similarities in personality and behavior. Child-rearing practices and consequent adult personality characteristics, biocultural aspects of child development and attachment, culture and behavior evolutionary models, politically linked personality, cognitive anthropology, psychology of narrative forms, comparative national character studies.

134A

Medical Anthropology (Hamdy, S.) (xlist Chc/Lat 178A) (MSTS Course)
Introduces students to cross-cultural perspectives and critical theories in anthropological studies of medicine. Special attention is given to diverse ways of understanding bodies, illnesses, and therapeutic practices in our changing world.

134B

Cultures of Biomedicine (Fletcher, E.)
An introduction to the anthropological study of biomedicine and biotechnology. Topics include medicalization, experimentation and discovery, diagnosis, expertise, health activism, and biotechnology

134F

Anthropology of the Body (O'Rourke, S.)
Examines human bodies as both biological and socio-cultural entities and explores the relationship among mind, body,and society cross-culturally. Topics include embodiment; race, sex, gender and the body; somatization; control of the body; commodified bodies; and hybrid/cyborg bodies.

139

Black Public Culture (Lecture A - Sojoyner, D.)
The focus of Black Public Culture is to analyze both the politics of the business of Black music and the artists and cultural practitioners who contributed to the development of Black communities, yet who are largely forgotten. At the conclusion of the course we will have discussed, read, listened to and viewed material pertaining to Black cultural production from the 1980's to the present.

139

Law and Violence (Lecture B - Al-Bulushi, S.)
What does it mean to act, govern, or protest in the name of 'humanity'? What sense can we make of the idea that compassion, violence, and the law are so intimately intertwined in today's world? As states, NGOs, and international institutions are increasingly preoccupied with the question of 'security,' this class will grapple with the reality that seemingly benign entities (e.g. the United Nations) are tasked with managing and policing the populations they claim to serve. We will critically engage with the idea of a purportedly universal 'humanity,' and with the notion of humanitarianism as an ethos, a set of laws, and a form of power. At the same time, we will grapple with questions of solidarity and justice, studying the convergences and divergences between imperial and anti-imperial invocations of 'humanity.' Drawing on ethnographic texts, we will explore the cultivation of sensibilities about grievable life, and consider how race, gender, and class shape policies and popular struggles that contend with how violence is named and how it is addressed.

139

Islam in American (Hamdy, S.)

This course is about the history of Islam and Muslims in the United States, with special attention to the role of slavery, extractive labor, migration, race, nationalism, citizenship, and the media. We will learn the core tenets of Islam and what wide varieties of Muslims believe and practice as they relate to institutions such as kinship, spirituality, and family life. We will pay attention to inequalities in the distributions of resources; to how particular cultural practices are depicted; and to how these intersect with race, class, national background, gender, and sexual orientation.

149

Archaeology in the Islamic World (Straughn, I.)
For nearly 1500 years Islamic culture has played a prominent role in the transformation of landscapes, cities, ideas and objects. This course uses the archaeological record from across the Middle East and beyond to explore those changes and what it can tell us about the various cultures and peoples (Muslim and non-Muslim alike) impacted by Islam.

163A

Peoples of the Pacific (Egan, J.)
The cultural history and recent developments among the Pacific peoples of Polynesia, Micronesia, Melanesia, New Guinea, and Australia

169

SE AS & SE AS Immigrants (Section A - Douglas, T.)
This class provides on overview on some of the histories and cultures of Southeast Asia and also looks at some groups of Southeast Asian immigrants who have come to the US. Geographically, Southeast Asia includes Insular Southeast Asia - Malaysia, Singapore, Indonesia, East Timor, Brunei, The Philippines, as well as Mainland Southeast Asia – Burma (Myanmar), Thailand, Cambodia, Laos, and Vietnam. Ecologically and culturally, we can also consider parts of southwestern China - Yunnan Province and parts of Szechuan Province, up to the borders of Tibet to be included as part of Southeast Asia.

169

Gold: Culture of a Barbarous Relic (Straughn, I.)
Before bitcoin, before derivatives and mortgage-backed securities, before even writing itself, there was gold. It reigned supreme for millennia in many cultures and its special qualities offer a lens through which this course will examine the workings of culture, politics and power. While we may not settle the conspiracy about whether there still is gold in Fort Knox, this course will analyze gold's unique hold over human imagination and cultural practice.

180AW

Culture, Space, Design (Anthro Major Seminar) (Section A - Marcus, G.)
This course will examine the uses of design techniques (especially drawn from theater design, or scenography) in
imaginatively addressing problems and ideas in anthropological analysis embedded in the narratives of past and well known contemporary ethnographic studies. Weekly short papers will revise and enhance ethnographic descriptions through proposing scenic design interventions.

180AW

Exploring Narrative (Anthro Major Seminar) (Section B - Varzi, R.)
Exploring Narrative is a writing workshop in which we will be reading form a selection of narrative styles and genres to the end of becoming better writers. We will explore ethnography, storytelling, expository essays, books on writing and participating in various writing exercises while working on a single writing project throughout the term.

H190B

Honors Field Research (Jenks, A.)
Students begin or continue ethnographic field research and gain experience with a variety of data collection methods, including participant-observation, interviews, surveys, and the study of archival and documentary materials.

 

Winter 2020 Course Offerings

Course Number
 
Course Title
2A

Intro to Socio-cultural Anthro (Lec A) (Kim, E.)
Introduction to cultural diversity and the methods used by anthropologists to account for it. Family relations, economic activities, politics, gender, and religion in a wide range of societies. Stresses the application of anthropological methods to research problems.

2A

Intro to Socio-cultural Anthro (Lec B) (Egan, J.)
Introduction to cultural diversity and the methods used by anthropologists to account for it. Family relations, economic activities, politics, gender, and religion in a wide range of societies. Stresses the application of anthropological methods to research problems.

2D

Intro to Language and Culture (Murphy, K.)
Explores what the study of language can reveal about ourselves as bearers of culture. After introducing some basic concepts, examines how cultural knowledge is linguistically organized and how language might shape our perception of the world.

10B

Probability & Statistics (Staff)
An introduction to probability and statistics. Emphasis on a thorough understanding of the probabilistic basis of statistical inference. Emphasizes examples from sociology, anthropology, and related social science disciplines.

20A

People, Cultures, and Environmental Sustainability (Egan, J.)

Anthropological consideration of global environmental sustainability from the perspective of human cultures and communities. Causes and consequences of population growth, natural resource management, environmental law, environmental ethics. Case studies emphasize tropical rain forests, arid lands of Africa and North America.

30A

Global Issues in Anthropological Perspective (Douglas, T.)

Explores anthropological perspectives on issues of importance in an increasingly global society. Topics include emphases on ethnic conflict; identity; immigration and citizenship; religion and religious diversity; medical anthropology; legal anthropology; development and economic change; gender.

41A

Global Cultures & Society (Douglas, T.)
Offers a general overview of the rise of global interdependence in political, economic, demographic, and cultural terms. Considers what drove people from relative isolation into intensified intercourse with one another, and investigates the consequences of this shift.

100A

Ethnography and Anthropological Methods (Section A - Olson, O.)
Anthropological research, learning ethnographic methods, and how to choose a research topic, construct research questions, explore library resources, collect data, and write an analytical paper on research findings.

125X

Transnational Migration (Chavez, L.)
Examines the movement of people across national borders, governmentality and the role of state practices to control populations, and issues of citizenship, belonging, and identity. Examples are drawn from the United States, Europe, Latin America, Asia, and Africa.

128A

Science, Technology, Controversy (Fletcher, E.)
Explores ways in which the social sciences conceive of science as a sociocultural practice. Emphasis on literature in Science and Technology Studies (STS), especially writings that concern the relationship of science to space and place, power, and politics.

129

Anthropology of Debt (Straughn, I.)
The United States has accumulated a $20+ trillion national debt. The financial company Experian declares: "Credit isn't just a score, it's a skill." Debt resistors have declared: "You are not a loan". Those striving for an education face a student loan burden in the US that rapidly approaches two trillion dollars. This course explores how debt, whether financial or in some other form, has shaped various cultures and our relationships with the earth, each other and even how we value ourselves. 

134A

Medical Anthropology (Jenks, A.)(xlist Chc/Lat 178A)(MSTS Course)
Introduces students to cross-cultural perspectives and critical theories in anthropological studies of medicine. Special attention is given to diverse ways of understanding bodies, illnesses, and therapeutic practices in our changing world.

134H

Anthropology of Food (Egan, J.)
Examines how food communicates ideas about ethnocentrism, disgust, privilege, gender, race, labor, social identities and hierarchies, globalization, power, and the "Western diet" and its health consequences.

136K

Anthropology of the Body (O'Rourke, S.)
Probes culture and politics of the female body in contemporary American life. Focusing on "feminine beauty," examines diverse notions of beauty, bodily practices, and body politics embraced by American women of different classes, ethnicities, and sexualities.

139

Critical Awareness & Social Justice (Peterson, K.)
This experimental course examines social realities, ethical action, and the imaginative possibilities of how life can be lived. It will do so through several means: via American secular interpretations of very early Buddhist texts as well as liberatory and political thought put forth by scholars, public thinkers, creative writers, and activists across multiple fields. We will develop a framework for critical awareness as we think with anthropology throughout the course. While the course will engage multiple textual forms, insight meditation and yoga practices will enhance intellectual insights. The course will examine how a combination of learning experiences can open new insights into the world as we relationally inhabit and imagine it.

139

Global Mental Health (Fletcher, E.)
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139

Anthropology of Religion (Varzi, R.)
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139

Encounters and Identities (Douglas, T.)
This course is an examination of how cultural anthropologists have examined and critiqued the concept of racial and ethnic identity, particularly within the United States. Through lectures, class discussion, readings and videos, students will engage the various intersections of identity constructs such as race, nation, gender, and socio-economic class. In this course an emphasis will be placed on various theoretical developments in the discipline such as post-modern and post-colonial approaches to the study of contemporary identity formation. Course materials will draw from a wide range of sources beginning with the European conquest of the Americas in the 16th century and concluding with anthropological research from the late 20th and early 21st centuries.

141A

Ancient Civilization of Mexico and the Southwest (Drover, C.)
The prehistory and cultural evolution of the civilization which originated in Mexico, including the Olmecs, Aztecs, Toltecs, Maya, and Zapotec, as well as the Pueblos of the Southwestern U.S. Topics include the origins of food production and of the state.

169

Egyptomania (Straughn, I.)
Through an introduction to the archaeology and culture of ancient Egypt, this course examines the fascination with all things Egypt. How did it become transformed into a field of study – Egyptology – and also emerge as a commercial, artistic and even spiritual passion. From archaeologists who toil to unearth the next great tomb, to purveyors of contemporary popular culture that seek to exploit the pyramids and their mysteries for commercial success, this course explores how the Egyptian past has shaped our perception of Egypt today as well as defining ourselves as consumers of its strangeness.

180AW

Writing Ethnography (Anthro Major Seminar) (Zhan, M.)
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180AW

Writing Sciences (Anthro Major Seminar) (Fortun, M.)
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H190C

Honors Research Analysis (Jenks, A.)
Students apply qualitative data analysis techniques to ethnographic data collected as part of their Honors research.

 

Spring 2020 Course Offerings

Course Number
 
Course Title
2A

Intro to Socio-cultural Anthro (Lec A) (O'Rourke, S.)
Introduction to cultural diversity and the methods used by anthropologists to account for it. Family relations, economic activities, politics, gender, and religion in a wide range of societies. Stresses the application of anthropological methods to research problems.

2A

Intro to Socio-cultural Anthro (Lec B) (Douglas, T.)
Introduction to cultural diversity and the methods used by anthropologists to account for it. Family relations, economic activities, politics, gender, and religion in a wide range of societies. Stresses the application of anthropological methods to research problems.

2A

Intro to Socio-cultural Anthro (Lec C) (Egan, J.)
Introduction to cultural diversity and the methods used by anthropologists to account for it. Family relations, economic activities, politics, gender, and religion in a wide range of societies. Stresses the application of anthropological methods to research problems.

2B

Introduction to Biological Anthropology (Egan, J.)
Evolutionary theory and processes, comparative primate fossil record, human variation, and the adequacy of theory, and empirical data.

2C

Intro to Archaeology (Straughn, I.)
What the heck is the archaeological record and why does it matter? This course explores how scholars and others derive knowledge of the past, examine cultural practices, and construct notions of heritage through the things we leave behind. Using case studies from across the globe students will learn how this field deploys various methods and theories in pursuit of the past and its peoples.

10C

Probability & Stats (Staff)(Home Dept. is Soc Sci)
An introduction to probability and statistics. Emphasis on a thorough understanding of the probabilistic basis of statistical inference. Emphasizes examples from sociology, anthropology, and related social science disciplines.

41A

Global Cultures & Society (Douglas, T.) (xlist IS 11) (Home Dept. is International Studies)
Offers a general overview of the rise of global interdependence in political, economic, demographic, and cultural terms. Considers what drove people from relative isolation into intensified intercourse with one another, and investigates the consequences of this shift.

45A

Science, Culture, Power (Fortun, M)
Examines science in historical and cultural context (Scientific and Darwinian Revolutions, Manhattan Project, contemporary biosciences) to understand scientific truths and their limits, scientists as social actors, and vital intersections of sciences with religion, politics, gender, and other forms of culture.

100B

Anthropology Careers (Richland, J.)

Gives students the skills and perspective needed to leverage undergraduate anthropology education in diverse career domains. Students explore different career domains (health care, tech development, environmental governance, etc.) and learn to represent themselves professionally.

121AW

Kinship and Social Organization (Egan, J.)

Organization of social life primarily in preindustrial societies. Theories of kinship, marriage regulations, sexual behavior, and social roles. Comparisons of biological, psychological, sociological, and economic explanations of social organization.

121D

Cross-Cultural Studies in Gender (Mahmud, L.)(xlist IS 153B) (Fulfills GE VII Multicultural)

Explores the construction of gender in national and transnational contexts. Special attention is given to how race, sexuality, class, and global inequalities shape different experiences of gender, and how gender structures political, institutional, and social life across the world.

128B

Race, Gender, and Science (Fletcher, E.)
Perfect for pre-health, science and social science majors wanting to appreciate how science and society interact. Race and gender as biological and socio-cultural constructs are examined. Questions explored: What is disease? What is science? What are social and biological differences?

128C

Digital Cultures (Boellstorff, T.)(MSTS Course)
Explores cultural and political implications of the infotech revolution and the ways new media are used around the world, new cultural practices and spaces (e.g., cybercafes), debates surrounding the meanings of these new technologies, and their implications for transforming society.

129

Standing with Standing Rock (Richland, J.)

Description

132A

Psychological Anthropology (O'Rourke, S.) (xlist Psych 173A)(MSTS Course)

Cultural differences and similarities in personality and behavior. Child-rearing practices and consequent adult personality characteristics, biocultural aspects of child development and attachment, culture and behavior evolutionary models, politically linked personality, cognitive anthropology, psychology of narrative forms, comparative national character studies.

134N

Disease, Health, and Inequality (Jenks, A.)
Examines the relationships among disease, health, and social inequality in the U.S. and globally. Topics include infectious and chronic disease case studies, health policy, and strategies for promoting health equity.

136B

History of Anthropological Theory (Douglas, T.)
Provides foundational knowledge in the discipline of anthropology by reviewing competing approaches in anthropological theory, from the nineteenth century to the present. Covers historically fundamental approaches—social evolutionism, functionalism—and recent movements such as feminism, cultural studies, poststructuralism, and postmodernism.

138

Prisons and Public Education (Sojoyner, D.)(xlist AfAm 159)
Looks at the connections between schools and prisons in the United States. Students learn about ideas that push beyond common trope of the "school to prison pipeline."

139

Themes in Sikh Studies (Hundle, A.)

Description

139

Critical Geopolitics (Al-Bulushi, S.)

Description

139

 

Anthropology of Social Services (Fletcher, E)

Description

139

Comics & Medicine (Hamdy, S.)

Description

 148

 I Dig UCI (Straughn, I.)

An introduction to archaeological fieldwork through participation in an active excavation on campus. Students engage with research design and learn the foundational methods of archaeological recovery: survey, mapping, sampling strategies, documentation, excavation, artifact identification, and interpretation.

 149

 Cognitive Archaeology (Drover, C.)

Cognitive archaeology is the attempt to reconstruct the Ideology of prehistoric cultures from material remains. While challenging, aspects of ritual, magic, religion, cosmology, iconography and epigraphy are reflected in the material remains of all cultures.

 169

 Captain Cook's Voyage (Marcus, G) (xlist HIST 183 (Seed, P.)

 This course traces the three famous voyages of Captain Cook in the Pacific Ocean during the later 18th century and through their contacts with diverse island peoples provide a perspective on how islands came to be occupied through technologies of sailing and navigation, how these people
formed their own cultures, and how ocean and island ecologies affect their character even up to the present day.

 180AW

 Anthropology Major Seminar (Nam, S.)

 

 H190A

 Honors Research Design (Hundle, A.)

Students design a research project and articulate its goals and significance. Written work consists of a research proposal describing the research questions, the relevant literature, methods of data collection and analysis, and ethical considerations 

 H190W

 Honors Thesis Writing (Jenks, A.)

Students draft a senior honors thesis (typically) with the following sections: problem statement, literature review, ethnographic background, and descriptions of the methods, results, and conclusions.

 

Summer Session I 2019 Course Offerings

2A
Intro to Sociocultural Anthro (Lec A) (Palmer, J.)
Introduction to cultural diversity and the methods used by anthropologists to account for it. Family relations, economic activities, politics, gender, and religion in a wide range of societies. Stresses the application of anthropological methods to research problems.
2A
Intro to Sociocultural Anthro (Lec B) (Egan, J.)
Introduction to cultural diversity and the methods used by anthropologists to account for it. Family relations, economic activities, politics, gender, and religion in a wide range of societies. Stresses the application of anthropological methods to research problems.
2B
Intro to Biological Anthrpology  (Egan, J.)
Evolutionary theory and processes, comparative primate fossil record, human variation, and the adequacy of theory, and empirical data.
25A
Environmental Injustice  (Fortun, K.)
Explores how pollution, climate change, and other environmental problems impact people around the world, often worsening social inequality. Students use social science frameworks to understand environmental problems, different interpretations of these problems, and how people have organized for political change.
41A
Global Cultures & Society (Mclaughlin-Alcock, C.)
Offers a general overview of the rise of global interdependence in political, economic, demographic, and cultural terms. Considers what drove people from relative isolation into intensified intercourse with one another, and investigates the consequences of this shift..
136K
Woman and the Body (O'Rourke, S.)
Probes culture and politics of the female body in contemporary American life. Focusing on "feminine beauty," examines diverse notions of beauty, bodily practices, and body politics embraced by American women of different classes, ethnicities, and sexualities.
138
Prisons and Public Education (Sojoyner, D.)
course description.

 

Summer Session II 2019 Course Offerings

2A
Intro to Sociocultural Anthro (Lec A) (Cox, K.)
Introduction to cultural diversity and the methods used by anthropologists to account for it. Family relations, economic activities, politics, gender, and religion in a wide range of societies. Stresses the application of anthropological methods to research problems.
2A
Intro to Sociocultural Anthro (Lec B) (Chavez, L.)
Introduction to cultural diversity and the methods used by anthropologists to account for it. Family relations, economic activities, politics, gender, and religion in a wide range of societies. Stresses the application of anthropological methods to research problems.
2D
Language & Culture (Kohler, G.)
Explores what the study of language can reveal about ourselves as bearers of culture. After introducing some basic concepts, examines how cultural knowledge is linguistically organized and how language might shape our perception of the world.
41A
Global Cultures & Society (Wrapp, Melissa.)
Offers a general overview of the rise of global interdependence in political, economic, demographic, and cultural terms. Considers what drove people from relative isolation into intensified intercourse with one another, and investigates the consequences of this shift.
134A
Medical Anthropology (Jenks, A.)
Introduces students to cross-cultural perspectives and critical theories in anthropological studies of medicine. Special attention is given to diverse ways of understanding bodies, illnesses, and therapeutic practices in our changing world.
162A
Peoples and Cultues of Latin America (Richart, R.)
Surveys the prehistory of Latin America and its indigenous cultures, emphasizing the impact of colonial rule, capitalism, and twentieth-century transformations. Emphasis on communities from several countries. In some years, emphasis on comparisons between the Latin American and Caribbean experiences.

 

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