COURSE OFFERINGS

Please note, this is a tentative list of course offerings and is subject to change.
Last updated July 31, 2018.
For the most current listing, see http://websoc.reg.uci.edu/perl/WebSoc.
 
 
Fall 2018 Course Offerings
2A
Introduction to Sociocultural Anthropology (Lec A - Zhan, M.)
Introduction to cultural diversity and the methods used by anthropologists to account for it. Family relations, economic activities, politics, gender, and religion in a wide range of societies. Stresses the application of anthropological methods to research problems.
2A
Introduction to Sociocultural Anthropology (Lec B - Douglas, T.)
Introduction to cultural diversity and the methods used by anthropologists to account for it. Family relations, economic activities, politics, gender, and religion in a wide range of societies. Stresses the application of anthropological methods to research problems.
2B
Introduction to Biological Anthropology (Egan, J.)
Evolutionary theory and processes, comparative primate fossil record, human variation, and the adequacy of theory, and empirical data.
2C

Intro to Archaeology (Drover, C.)
Archaeological theory and cultural processes with emphasis on the American Southwest, Mesoamerica, and Mesopotamia.

10A

Probability & Stats (Huffman, M.)
An introduction to probability and statistics. Emphasis on a thorough understanding of the probabilistic basis of statistical inference. Emphasizes examples from sociology, anthropology, and related social science disciplines.

25A Environmental Injustice (Fortun, K.)
Explores how pollution, climate change, and other environmental problems impact people around the world, often worsening social inequality. Students use social science frameworks to understand environmental problems, different interpretations of these problems, and how people have organized for political change.
41A Global Cultures and Society (Douglas, T.)
Offers a general overview of the rise of global interdependence in political, economic, demographic, and cultural terms. Considers what drove people from relative isolation into intensified intercourse with one another, and investigates the consequences of this shift.
125A
Economic Anthropology (Egan, J.)
Economic systems in comparative perspective: production, distribution, and consumption in market and non-market societies; agricultural development in the third world.
132A
Psychological Anthropology (O'Rourke, S.)
Cultural differences and similarities in personality and behavior. Child-rearing practices and consequent adult personality characteristics, biocultural aspects of child development and attachment, culture and behavior evolutionary models, politically linked personality, cognitive anthropology, psychology of narrative forms, comparative national character studies.
134A
Medical Anthropology (Jenks, A.)
Introduces students to cross-cultural perspectives and critical theories in anthropological studies of medicine. Special attention is given to diverse ways of understanding bodies, illnesses, and therapeutic practices in our changing world.
134F Anthropology of the Body (O'Rourke, S.)
Examines human bodies as both biological and sociocultural entities and explores the relationship among mind, body,and society cross-culturally. Topics include embodiment; race, sex, gender and the body; somatization; control of the body; commodified bodies; and hybrid/cyborg bodies.
139A Anthropology of Debt (Straughn, I.)
Student debt approaches $1.5 trillion while the US national debt climbs to $22 trillion. How has such fantastical indebtedness shaped culture, identity and social practice across the globe and through time? This course examines how debt becomes entangled with all manner of cultural phenomena: slavery, hierarchy, consumption, markets, ritual practice, racism, gender and, of course, education.
139B

Nationalism, Extremism, & the Right (Mahmud, L.)
Nationalism is a cultural and political category. Classic texts on the nation as an "imagined community" are assigned alongside their feminist and postcolonial critiques to contextualize ideologies of citizenship and belonging within particular experiences of gender, race, sexuality, class, religion.

139C
Fringe Archeology (Straughn, I.)
Archaeology has inspired, and even, actively encouraged any number of theories about aliens, lost civilizations, dark conspiracies, apocalyptic predictions, and mysterious technologies. How did this scholarly field that examines the past through the material remains of human societies, become so intimately caught up in such fantastical notions?
163A
Peoples of the Pacific (Egan, J.)
The cultural history and recent developments among the Pacific peoples of Polynesia, Micronesia, Melanesia, New Guinea, and Australia.
169A
SE AS & SE AS Immigrants (Douglas, T.)
169C Transnational Korea
180AW Anthro Major Seminar (O'Rourke, S.)
A course in anthropological theory designed especially for majors in Anthropology.

 

Winter 2019 Course Offerings

2A
Intro to Sociocultural Anthro (Lec A) (Kim, E.)
Introduction to cultural diversity and the methods used by anthropologists to account for it. Family relations, economic activities, politics, gender, and religion in a wide range of societies. Stresses the application of anthropological methods to research problems.
2A
Intro to Sociocultural Anthro (Lec B) (Egan, J.)
Introduction to cultural diversity and the methods used by anthropologists to account for it. Family relations, economic activities, politics, gender, and religion in a wide range of societies. Stresses the application of anthropological methods to research problems.
2D
Intro to Language Culture  (Richland, J.)
Explores what the study of language can reveal about ourselves as bearers of culture. After introducing some basic concepts, examines how cultural knowledge is linguistically organized and how language might shape our perception of the world
10B
Probability & Statstics  (Faust, K)
An introduction to probability and statistics. Emphasis on a thorough understanding of the probabilistic basis of statistical inference. Emphasizes examples from sociology, anthropology, and related social science disciplines.
20A
People, Culture, and Environmental Sustainability (Egan, J.)
Anthropological consideration of global environmental sustainability from the perspective of human cultures and communities. Causes and consequences of population growth, natural resource management, environmental law, environmental ethics. Case studies emphasize tropical rain forests, arid lands of Africa and North America.
30A
Global Issues in Anthropological Perspective (Douglas, T.)
Explores anthropological perspectives on issues of importance in an increasingly global society. Topics include emphases on ethnic conflict; identity; immigration and citizenship; religion and religious diversity; medical anthropology; legal anthropology; development and economic change; gender.
30B
Ethnography and Anthropological Methods (Peterson, K.)
Explores ethnography, anthropology's classic method. Students obtain hands-on training in participant observation, interviewing, and other methods, in local communities, and the preparation of research reports. Also provides theoretical and reflexive readings on ethnography.
130C
Visual Anthropology (Varzi, R.)
Focusing on the construction of culture through visuality, this course engages traditional ethnographic films, popular media and anthropological texts to analyze ethics, "reality" and fiction; propaganda and documentary, construction of a frame, the responsibility of the filmmaker, photographer, and anthropologist.
41A
Global Cultures & Society (Douglas, T.)
Offers a general overview of the rise of global interdependence in political, economic, demographic, and cultural terms. Considers what drove people from relative isolation into intensified intercourse with one another, and investigates the consequences of this shift.
121AW
Kinship and Social Organization (Egan, J.)
Organization of social life primarily in preindustrial societies. Theories of kinship, marriage regulations, sexual behavior, and social roles. Comparisons of biological, psychological, sociological, and economic explanations of social organization.
121D
Cross-Cultural Studies in Gender (Mahmud, L.)
Familiarizes students with the diversity of women's experiences around the world. Gender roles and relations are examined within cultural and historical contexts. A central concern is how class, race, and global inequalities interact with women's status.
121J
Urban Anthropology (Sojoyner, D.)
Cultural roles of urban centers and processes of urbanization in comparative perspective, focusing on both non-western, nonindustrial societies of past and present; the relationship between modern urban centers and Third World peoples. Migration, urban poverty, in Africa, Asia, Latin America.
125F
Humans and Other Animals (Olson, V.)
Explores peoples' relationships with other animals, a topic that continues to shape anthropological understandings of humanness, culture, and the social. Subthemes: symbol and matter, nature/culture, ontologies, relations, moralities, ecologies, futures.
128A
Science, Technology, Controversy (STAFF)
Explores ways in which the social sciences conceive of science as a sociocultural practice. Emphasis on literature in Science and Technology Studies (STS), especially writings that concern the relationship of science to space and place, power, and politics.
128B
Race, Gender & Science (STAFF)
Perfect for pre-health, science and social science majors wanting to appreciate how science and society interact. Race and gender as biological and socio-cultural constructs are examined. Questions explored: What is disease? What is science? What are social and biological differences.
134A
Medical Anthropology (STAFF)
Introduces students to cross-cultural perspectives and critical theories in anthropological studies of medicine. Special attention is given to diverse ways of understanding bodies, illnesses, and therapeutic practices in our changing world.
136K
Woman and the Body (O'Rourke, S.)
Probes culture and politics of the female body in contemporary American life. Focusing on "feminine beauty," examines diverse notions of beauty, bodily practices, and body politics embraced by American women of different classes, ethnicities, and sexualities.
141A
Ancient Civilizations of Mexico & Southwest (Drover, C.)
The prehistory and cultural evolution of the civilization which originated in Mexico, including the Olmecs, Aztecs, Toltecs, Maya, and Zapotec, as well as the Pueblos of the Southwestern U.S. Topics include the origins of food production and of the state.
169A
Islam, Culture and ID (Straugh, I.)
course description
169B
SouthEast Asia (Douglas, T.)
course description
169C
Egyptomania (Straughn, I.)
course description
180AW
Anthropology Major Seminar - Science Writing (Fortun, M.)
A course in anthropological theory designed especially for majors in Anthropology

Spring 2019 Course Offerings

2A
Introduction to Sociocultural Anthropology (Lec A - Bernal, V.)
2A
Introduction to Sociocultural Anthropology (Lec B -Douglas, T.)
2B
Introduction to Biological Anthropology (Egan, J.)
2C
Introduction to Archaeology (Drover, C.)
30B
Ethnography & Anthropological Field Methods (Egan, J.)
41A
Global Cultures & Society (Douglas, T.)
45A
Science, Culture, Power (Fortun, M.)
121AW
Kinship and Social Organization (Egan, J.)
121J
Urban Anthropology (Nam, S.)
132A
Psychological Anthropology (O'Rourke, S.)
134B
Cultures of Biomedicine (STAFF)
134C
Medicine, Food, and Health (Olson, V.)
134F
Anthropology of the Body (STAFF)
136B
History of Anthropological Theory (Douglas, T.)
139
Prisons & Public Education (Sojoyner, D.)
149 Cognitive Archaeology (Drover, C.)
149 Archaeology, Politics and Identity (Straughn, I.)
149 I Dig UCI (Straughn, I.)
165A
Modern Iran: Cinema and Society (Varzi, R.)
169
Captain Cook (Marcus, G./Seed, P.)
H191AW
Honors Writing Seminar (Jenks, A.)

 

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